Lifestyle

A look back

THE ST. JOHN the Baptist Catholic Church in Comox is being remade into an arts centre. - PHOTO SUBMITTED
THE ST. JOHN the Baptist Catholic Church in Comox is being remade into an arts centre.
— image credit: PHOTO SUBMITTED

Every Friday we feature Valley history taken from our back issues.

Five years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

A Courtenay tattoo parlour was set to close due to a history of illegal drug activity.

Atomic Tattoo and Body Piercing was going to lose its business licence as of March 10 after Comox Valley RCMP requested the business no longer be allowed to operate.

"It is our opinion the premises ... will again in the future become the site of illegal activity," said RCMP Insp. Tom Gray. "It's time to put an end to it."

Almost a month earlier, the business owner was charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking.

When police searched the premises, they found 6.25 ounces of cocaine, a false wall and a person flushing cocaine down a toilet, among other things.

Ten years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

The local dinosaur scene was seeing plenty of action.

The Royal British Columbia Museum and the Courtenay Museum teamed up to promote fossils on Vancouver Island. An upcoming exhibit at the Provincial Museum was expected to generate an extra 25,000 visitors to the Comox Valley thanks to the promotion of the Courtenay Museum at the Provincial Museum level.

Meanwhile, the Royal Tyrell Museum's Dr. Elizabeth Nicholls was on her way to the Comox Valley to name the mosasaur, which was found in the Puntledge River in 1991.

Fifteen years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

Mount Washington had the most snow of any resort in Canada with a base of more than 500 centimetres — but the mass amounts of white stuff came with a cost.

"Our snow removal costs out of parking, roads and public areas have more than doubled over an average year like last year," said Greg Scott, manager of marketing and sales.

"We're actually trucking snow away for the first time ever," added Rick Curiston, director of mountain operations.

Twenty years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

Alarmed by an incident where a handgun was found in a junior secondary school, Comox Valley trustees wanted to ensure punishment for bringing weapons to school was tough.

"I move, where any student is disciplined for a weapon, that the student  is brought before the board before that student is reinstated," said trustee Len Morrow.

Trustee Mary Hanson added: "Students who are brought before the board will be suspended, and made to take home-bound courses."

Twenty five years ago this week in the Comox Valley Record:

Protesters filled the Campbell River courthouse in support of 18 people arrested for protest activities in the park last month.

Friends of Strathcona Park were protesting mining in the park.

About 50 people waved placards outside before proceedings started. The small courtroom was jam-packed, as was the lobby, during the proceedings.

A total of 38 people had been arrested since blockading in the park started in January.

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