News

Courtenay council denies delegation appeal

Pipeline protesters gathered at Courtenay City Hall before Monday
Pipeline protesters gathered at Courtenay City Hall before Monday's council meeting. The group appealed a decision to deny a request to appear as a delegation to discuss bitumen pipeline proposals. Council decided the matter does not fall within its jurisdiction. The delegation consisted of representatives from Leadnow.ca, Dogwood Initiative and the Council of Canadians.
— image credit: Scott Stanfield

Courtenay Council defeated a motion by Ronna-Rae Leonard to allow a delegation of pipeline protesters to speak at its Aug. 5 meeting. Coun. Doug Hillian was absent for the vote.

At Monday’s meeting, the group appealed a decision to deny a request to appear as a delegation July 7 to discuss pipeline twinning proposals and tanker exports through coastal waters.

Council had decided the matter does not fall within its jurisdiction.

The delegation consisted of representatives from Leadnow.ca, Dogwood Initiative and the Council of Canadians.

In a letter to council, Jay Baker-French cited a number of precedents to explain why council should hear from the delegation. He noted the Union of B.C. Municipalities adopted two resolutions similar to that which the delegates wished to present to council. One opposes oil transport by pipeline in B.C., the other opposes tanker traffic in coastal waters.

“It is unclear to us how this issue is outside of Courtenay’s jurisdiction when UBCM, a group that includes municipalities that would not be as directly affected by tanker disasters or the negative effect of pipelines on our economy as Courtenay would be, has judged it within theirs,” stated Baker-French, a volunteer with Leadnow.ca.

In a 4-3 vote last week, Comox council defeated a motion to consider appealing a decision not to allow a delegation request from a citizen-led group concerned about the Enbridge Northern Gateway Project. The intent was to gather support from council regarding opposition to pipelines and tankers in B.C. Staff said the request did not fall within the town’s jurisdiction.

Cumberland council allowed a presentation from the delegation.

• Council gave second reading to a zoning amendment for a single family development northeast of Costco at Crown Isle Boulevard and Ryan Road. The applicant — Silver Sand Corp. — plans to construct 31 lots.

Four people attended a public information about the project.

“This development in this area makes great sense,” Coun. Jon Ambler said.

The subdivision plan includes a trail that will connect to the college and new hospital.

A public hearing will be held at the Aug. 5 meeting.

• The BC government has decided to exclude medical marijuana from eligibility for farm classification for property assessment and tax purposes. The province will continue to view medical marijuana production facilities as an allowable farm use on ALR lands.

Earlier in the year, council adopted a zoning amendment bylaw that permits the production of medicinal marijuana in a building but prohibits growing as a home occupation.

Council approved Bill Anglin’s motion to obtain legal advice on the issue.

 

 

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

 

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

NDP blasts lottery corporation spending
 
Site C dam construction to start next summer
 
Salvation Army 2014 campaign needs a cash infusion
Murder suspect back in the U.S.
 
B.C. to announce Peace River dam decision
 
Mental health for children and youth
Minister touts value of small business in Chemainus
 
Retired cop punched in road rage incident
 
Province urged to cut Port Mann tolls during Pattullo work

Community Events, December 2014

Add an Event


Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Dec 16 edition online now. Browse the archives.