An evening in India will feature traditional Indian dancing.

An Evening in India a cultural celebration in Comox

Little Red Church in Comox, Sunday, Nov. 30

  • Wed Nov 26th, 2014 6:00am
  • News

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An Evening in India is a cultural exposition and celebration of the country of India.

The event, which will feature a photography exhibit, storytelling, dance performances and delicious Indian treats, is designed to recreate the atmosphere of an Indian festival, and to build bridges within our international community.

Admission to the event — to be held at the Little Red Church in Comox, Sunday, Nov. 30 — is by donation ($5-$10 suggested). Proceeds will go towards the production of a documentary film about the environmental impact of westernization on India.

The event will include an exhibit of photos by documentary filmmaker and photographer Jennifer Pickford, who has made two spiritual journeys to India. She is in the process of developing a feature documentary film about the contradictory nature of the country.

An Evening in India will also feature storyteller Hazel Lennox, who will talk about her own experiences in the mystical country of India. There will also be a traditional Rajasthani folk dance performed by Comox Valley dancer Cathy Stoyko, as well as traditional Sikh dance performances by international students from North Island College.

Complimentary Indian treats and chai tea will be provided by Spice Hut Comox Valley.

About the photo exhibit

“Through the photography exhibit, I will recreate the dichotomy of my experiences in India,” says Pickford. “One group of photos will consist of those that display the beautiful, sacred aspects of India: the beautiful hilltop temples; young boys gathering to put together flower puja (prayer) offerings to be floated down the holy Ganges in Rishikesh; the palaces of the romantic city of Udaipur, Rajasthan.

“These will be juxtaposed next to others that display the more unpleasant aspects of India: women shrouded in cloth from head to toe, with only their eyes exposed, for fear of being sexually targeted; piles upon piles of garbage and pollution; entire families sleeping on sidewalks in the streets of Mumbai.

“Two visits and six months in India led me to something of a spiritual dilemma: how can I pretend that I am not troubled by some of the things I witness, and how can I live with my conscience knowing that it is in fact my own western culture that is responsible for some of the problems I see around me?”

Doors open at 7 p.m., performances begin at 8 p.m.

For more information, phone 250-218-0174.

Email:  info@pickfordproductions.com