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Man's best friend not his

February 19, 2013 · 11:36 AM
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Dear editor,

I've decided to take a risky plunge, and wade right into the debate, about the prolific and wanton distribution, of doggie defecate.

You know, the doggy doo that hides in the grass and sticks like glue to your shoe. Dark, dank, dense and viscous, these prolific putrid public piles, are the height of doggie owners dumping hubris.

Have you ever been enjoying the cool feel, of green grass on your hot feet? Have your toes been tingling in that great grass greenness, on a sizzling hot summer day?

If so, there is a high probability that this sensuous digital experience has been interrupted, by a mushy, malodorous, mound of bacteria laden pooh, coursing like warm lard underneath your foot and between your toes, making you wish you had worn shoes.

Who knows what the consequences of these close encounters of the fecund formations, of the feces kind might be? Heartworms, tapeworms, hookworms and roundworms, salmonellosis; let's not forget dysentery.

That's right, the next time your kid is sick, or you are puking your guts out on your knees in your bathroom, it might be courtesy of the cute little doggie, that left its mark in the middle of last weekend's family outing, or the pound of pooh you stepped in, running on the nature path.

If that not enough, there is also a very high probability that when walking home, dragging your poop-covered shoe on the grass of the boulevard that a dog will begin to serenade you.

Yes, chained to a picnic table, locked in a kennel, shut up in a basement room, ignored and neglected, however exalted and respected, this is also how you treat man's best friend.

When I walk the streets, I hear the pained and distraught laments, that echo around each neighbourhood. They are the howls of lost and forgotten dogs, desperately and frenetically barking for some kind of end.

Man's best friend isn't mine.

The Economist magazine reported that last year that in Asia, humans consumed over 10 million dogs as food. Now I'm not quite at the point of advocating puppies as chow.

Perhaps a less tasty but more practical approach would be for all you dog owners to take responsibility, if only to keep the tables from turning, for your pets?

Steve W. Hodge,

Comox