Justice Minister Suzanne Anton expects the Civil Resolution Tribunal will result in faster strata property dispute resolution at lower cost

Condo dispute tribunal begins work

Early intake of strata property dispute resolution applications begins for Canada's first online tribunal

B.C.’s Civil Resolution Tribunal has begun taking “early intake” applications for strata property disputes.

Canada’s first online tribunal is not yet fully operational, and is testing its application process. The tribunal has 18 lawyers and mediation experts who will adjudicate strata property and small claims disputes without going to court.

Legislation to create the tribunal was passed in the spring of 2015. Justice Minister Suzanne Anton said at the time that the tribunal and its early resolution process “will help to resolve disputes faster and with more lasting outcomes, while saving people time and money.”

The tribunal is expecting a large spike of strata-related claims as it starts up, and warns that it could take several months to resolve claims as it continues to add staff and develop its technology.

The tribunal has a guide to its service on its website. The application begins with a “solutions explorer” where people describe the nature of their dispute and then receive detailed information about their options under B.C. law.

The first suggestion is to use form letters to contact the other party in the dispute directly, to see if it can be settled without a formal application to the tribunal.

[See video introduction below.]

Most strata claims have a two-year limitation period, after which they can’t be taken to the tribunal or to court. If an early intake application is accepted, it may stop the countdown and allow the case to be prepared for when tribunal members begin hearing cases.

If applicants are accepted and then change their minds and want to go to court instead, approval of the tribunal is required.

Just Posted

SLIDESHOW: Remembrance Day in Courtenay

The annual ceremony took place in front of a large crowd under rainy skies.

CVN invites the public to learn about wolves

Comox Valley Nature is pleased to host a public lecture featuring author Paula Wild

Hornby Island gets ready to build Arts Centre

Construction is planned to start in the coming year

BCTF rejects mediator’s recommendations for settlement

Negotiations between B.C. teachers and the province will continue

Elevates plans to do concert series in Cumberland again

Summer event aims to make the arts barrier-free for the community

VIDEO: Hong Kong police shoot protester, man set on fire

It was the second protester shot since the demonstrations began in early June

Sportsnet fires Don Cherry after negative comments about immigrants

Don Cherry had said immigrants don’t wear poppies like other Canadians do

Trudeau’s new cabinet: Gender parity because it’s 2019? Or due to competence?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will soon appoint his new cabinet

Canada among three G20 countries least likely to hit emissions targets

It says Canada, South Korea and Australia are the farthest off

Conservatives’ Scheer wants Trudeau to open Parliament Nov. 25

That’s five days after Justin Trudeau is scheduled to swear in a new cabinet

Last remaining Centurion tank from the Korean War makes its journey ‘home’ to B.C.

Tank arrives in B.C. the day before Remembrance Day after a more than 4,500-kilometre transfer

‘Your vehicle burns a lot of fuel:’ Victoria drivers wake up to angry notes

‘This handbill was left on your vehicle because your vehicle burns a lot of fuel,’ notes read

Canadians mark Remembrance Day this morning

This year exactly 101 years to the day after the end of the First World War

Devils strike early, hang on for 2-1 win over Canucks

Vancouver now 0-8-3 in last 11 games versus New Jersey

Most Read