Trans Mountain pipeline expansion work near Jasper Alberta

Long list of conditions for Trans Mountain approval

Kinder Morgan says 145 conditions on wildlife, ocean impact, earthquake and other hazards is "rigorous but achievable"

The National Energy Board has released a draft list of 145 conditions for approval of Kinder Morgan Canada’s oil pipeline expansion project, including environmental protection plans for land and marine operations.

Conditions include the possibility of dredging for the expansion of the Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, where the original Trans Mountain pipeline has delivered crude oil and refined products since 1953.

Kinder Morgan is proposing to twin the line to ramp up shipments of diluted bitumen from northern Alberta that began intermittently in the late 1980s. The $5.4 billion expansion project would nearly triple the line’s capacity to 890,000 barrels per day, resulting in a seven-fold increase in oil tankers entering and leaving Vancouver harbour.

Kinder Morgan Canada president Ian Anderson said Thursday the company will be seeking clarification on the timing of some of the conditions, and will file its comments to the NEB review panel Aug. 20. Most major conditions, including plans for watercourse crossings along the route, are to be filed at least 90 days before construction begins.

“Our initial review of the draft conditions is that they are rigorous but achievable,” Anderson said.

NEB hearings are to resume Aug. 24, where the B.C. government is expected to formalize its position, based on Premier Christy Clark’s five conditions for new heavy oil pipelines. They include a “world-class” spill response capability on land and sea, approval and benefit sharing by affected First Nations, and a still-undefined “fair share” of benefits for the province.

Those conditions were included in B.C.’s position opposing the Enbridge Northern Gateway project, which the federal government approved with its own list of more than 200 conditions. The province does not have authority to veto either pipeline project, as each would run from Alberta to B.C.

Draft conditions for Trans Mountain include identification of all sites on the proposed second line affected by earthquake, including the “Holocene for Sumas Fault, Vedder Mountain Fault, Fraser River-Straight Creek Fault and Rocky Mountain Trench, as well as other possible hidden faults.”

Conditions also include submitting records of landowner consultation on the route, and a plan for aboriginal participation in monitoring construction.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

PHOTOS: Oyster River Fire Department hands out awards

Oyster River Fire Rescue held its 2019 Annual Awards Banquet on Jan.… Continue reading

Courtenay church offers free family clothing centre

Every Tuesday afternoon, 1-3 p.m., the Courtenay Fellowship Baptist Church (2963 Lake… Continue reading

Was there a tornado in Courtenay on Monday?

Suspected phone app glitch gives eerie warning

Record produced by Courtenay’s Doug Cox earns Juno nomination

He worked with fiddler April Verch in Nashville on classic country record

No bears destroyed in Cumberland in 2019

WildSafeBC coordinator updates Village on successes and challenges

Feds preparing plane to fly Canadians out of Wuhan, once China gives OK

160 Canadians have asked for help to leave province at centre of coronavirus outbreak

Comox Valley Beefs & Bouquets for the week of Jan. 28

Beef to loud talkers; bouquet to medical personnel

60% of Canadian workers would take a pay cut for better mental health support: survey

Survey found 77% of workers would leave for better wellness initiatives

Runaway rail car reported on same B.C. train line as fatal 2019 derailment

CP Rail confirmed the incident happened on Jan. 14.

Police arrest Baby Bear statue thief in Island community

Suspect alleged to be responsible for other crimes in Chemainus, Nanaimo, Ladysmith and Alberta

Southern resident orca L41 considered missing and feared dead

The orca was last spotted in August 2019 when photographed in western Strait of Juan de Fuca

‘Critically low’ caribou population prompts wolf cull in the Chilcotin

Itcha-Ilgachuz herd numbers down to 385, from 2,800 in 2003

RCMP to review fatal B.C. train derailment investigation after evidence points to ‘cover up’

The derailment, which occurred on Feb. 4, 2019, killed three men from Calgary

Most Read