Railway service important to our present, not just our past

The rail supply chain in Canada is core to our economy and standard of living.

By Michael Bourque

The rail supply chain in Canada is core to our economy and standard of living. Rail service allows small, medium and large businesses to compete globally. Railways in Canada provide efficient service while operating in a safe, environmentally sustainable manner.

The Lac-Mégantic accident was a tragedy that affected everyone across the Canadian railway industry. As we wait for investigators to piece together the unusual sequence of events that led to this tragedy, the railway industry is working to ensure that it is never repeated.

People from across the country have asked about dangerous goods travelling through their communities. It’s important to know that railways in Canada routinely share this information with municipal officials and responders to help develop emergency response plans.

Railways are subject to extensive and rigorous safety regulation including the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act. Regulations apply to all railway companies in Canada transporting dangerous goods. Those under provincial jurisdiction might be subject to additional rules and safeguards.

Urban rail expansion, and the practice of developing land in close proximity to rail operations, has generated a variety of opportunities and challenges for municipalities, developers and railways. New land use guidelines promote best practices and awareness about issues associated with development near railway operations such as noise, vibration, emissions, safety and design.

Rail is a safe and more environmentally responsible option for transporting dangerous goods critical to Canadians. Railways move 70 million people and 71 per cent of all surface goods but generate only three per cent of greenhouse gases for the transportation sector.

In time, we will learn more about the causes of the tragedy at Lac-Mégantic. In the meantime, railways are working hard to provide safe and reliable transportation for people, goods and the economy.

Michael Bourque is president/CEO of the Railway Association of Canada.

 

Just Posted

Merville resident looking for help to name original settler families

Janice Isenor is hoping to figure out which families settled where in Merville 100 years ago

Cultural sharing for Comox Valley School District song unveiling

After nearly a year in the making, a special gift was presented… Continue reading

Best of World Community Film Fest screens Tuesday

The votes are in from the recent World Community Film Festival and… Continue reading

Union Bay Improvement District board apologizes to trustee; deadline remains for other demands

UBID board complies with one of the demands of a letter threatening legal action

Valley’s Women’s Memorial March honours those missing and murdered

On Thursday morning shortly before noon, around 60 people gathered to honour… Continue reading

WATCH: Historic night in Red Deer as 2019 Canada Winter Games kicks off

Star-studded Opening Ceremony features athletes from across Canada

Eight cases of measles confirmed in Vancouver outbreak

Coastal Health official say the cases stem from the French-language Ecole Jules Verne Secondary

Plecas won’t run in next election if B.C. legislature oversight reforms pass

B.C. Speaker and Abbotsford South MLA says he feels ‘great sympathy’ for Jody Wilson-Raybould

Workshop with ‘accent reduction’ training cancelled at UBC

The workshop was cancelled the same day as an email was sent out to international students

Former B.C. premier Gordon Campbell accused of sexual touching

Accuser went to police, interviewed by Britian’s Daily Telegraph

Man in Vancouver Island hotel shooting pleads guilty to second-degree murder

Brandon Tyler Woody, from Victoria, to be sentenced in late March in B.C. Supreme Court

Judge rules Abbotsford home must be sold after son tries to evict mom

Mom to get back down payment and initial expenses

Trump officially declares national emergency to build border wall

President plans to siphon billions from federal military construction and counterdrug efforts

Most Read