The Fireside Fork: The evolution of campfire cooking utensils

Randy Brouwer hopes his product will become a staple in every camper’s kit.

Randy Brouwer hopes to revolutionize campfire cooking with the Fireside Fork.

Hans Peter Meyer

Special to The Record

Innovations are often very simple solutions to problems we didn’t know we had.

Randy Brouwer wanted to improve a simple camping experience. His product will become a staple in every camper’s kit. The experience: roasting food over an open fire. The innovation: the Fireside Fork.

What is it?

The design is simple. Three aluminum rods that screw together easily. A fixed wooden handle at one end. An innovative sliding wooden handle in the middle. Your choice of wide or narrow fork at the other end.

The Fireside Fork sells separately, or as a package of two in a zippered case (it’ll fit in your glove box). Additional attachments – a roasting basket for meat, seafood and vegetables, and a popcorn maker – are coming on stream later in 2016. Another add-on turns the Fireside Fork into a portable rotisserie.

Inspiration

The Fireside Fork was born in late 2013 as Brouwer tinkered with a gift idea. Success with friends and family inspired him to get serious about design and production. Since then, “it’s taken off widely!” A Kickstarter campaign (launching March 15) will get Fireside Forks into the hands of campers and picnic lovers all over North America. Several large retail outlets are planning to carry the Fireside Forks by mid-2016.

Where to buy?

Fireside Forks are available in a number of Comox Valley retail outlets. They’re also available directly from the Imagine Camping website.

Challenges

The work of bringing a product like the Fireside Forks to market is daunting. “There’s a lot to learn!” He says the #WeAreYQQ business development workshops have been instrumental in helping him overcome some of the hurdles facing his business.

Is a camping innovation important? It could be. The economic future of our community depends on people like Randy Brouwer. People who have the gumption to take small ideas and grow them BIGger.

The #WeAreYQQ Project is all about inspiring and supporting entrepreneurs like Randy. A grassroots effort, the #WeAreYQQ Project is supported by Solution Sponsors like The Comox Valley Record, Finneron Hyundai, hanspetermeyer.ca, Mastermynde Strategy, and Sure Copy Courtenay, Community Partners like Atlas Cafe, Hansen & Hansen Painting, Hollie Wood Oysters, Island Word, and My Tech Guys, as well as a host of individual Champions and Ambassadors.

Got a business idea? Put it on deck with the #WeAreYQQ Project!

FMI see http://weareyqq.ca/networkingonsteroids/

 

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