The Valley’s ‘biggest little sign company’ turning big heads

Brandon Galandy is the entrepreneur behind Hi-Lite Sign Service.

Brandon Galandy owns Hi-Lite Sign Service

You might not know him, and may not have heard of him. But unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve seen his work all around town.

Brandon Galandy is the 30-year-old entrepreneur behind Hi-Lite Sign Service, which touts itself as “the biggest little sign company in the Comox Valley.” Though the young entrepreneur has only been in business five years, he’s earned a reputation as the go-to guy for installing Vancouver Island signage for some of Canada’s best-known companies.

Locally, Hi-Lite has been called upon to install the golden arches of the McDonald’s restaurant at the top of Ryan Road, as well as prominent new storefront signs for Mark’s, Scion and Courtenay’s newest Tim Hortons. Elsewhere on the Island, he’s installed high-profile signage for Hudson’s Bay in Nanaimo’s Woodgrove Centre, and the Ford dealerships in Port Alberni and Port Hardy.

“A company’s image holds its weight,” says Galandy. “A sign is often what gives customers their first impression, so it’s essential to a company’s success. Some see it as a small role, but I see it as vital; I really enjoy doing my part to help other businesses succeed.”

Galandy’s own success all started with a part-time job working for his uncle in the Okanagan eight years ago, which he describes as a “fortunate accident.”

“The trade kind of found me,” he says with typical humility. “I gained a lot of experience working with my uncle, and then later with another sign company here on the Island. But the past five years on my own is really where I’ve learned the most. You work incredibly hard when you’re working for yourself.”

That hard work has included long hours and continuous networking, plus collaboration with North America’s industry leader, Pattison Sign Group. Young, enthusiastic and fond of a good pun, Galandy is showing no signs of slowing down. He’s already looking south at potential contracts down-Island – but not, he says, if that expansion would come at the cost of sacrificing his service ideals locally.

“It’s not about who the client is or how big they are, it’s about what I can do for them given their needs and budget,” he explains. “I really enjoy working with local businesses at any level. We can design and install nearly any sign imaginable, so there really isn’t a job that’s too big or too small.”

To learn more about Galandy and Hi-Lite Sign Service, visit www.hi-litesignservice.com or call 250-650-4059.

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