Call for nominations from Therapeutic Riding Society

Board elections upcoming

The Comox Valley Therapeutic Riding Society (www.cvtrs.com) is calling for nominations of candidates for the December board of directors election.

We invite you to consider running in our directors’ election to help us ensure the ongoing success of this highly beneficial society.

As a member of our board, you’ll have an opportunity to help lead this well-respected organization, celebrating 30 years of excellence, in offering therapeutic equine-based programs for people with mental, physical and emotional challenges in the North Island.

With the help of over 175 volunteers, we conduct one of the largest therapeutic riding programs in British Columbia, with more than 150 clients attending per week.

If elected, you would, with six other board members, establish and administer the CVTRS overall policies and objectives, which provide the direction for employees and volunteers to most effectively serve our clients. Directors attend monthly and special board meetings, and serve on a variety of committees.

We are seeking board members who reflect a diversity of background and experience and encourage a culture of continuous learning with skills in the following areas: accounting, fundraising, current best practices for non-profits, and meeting facilitation as well as an appreciation for the CVTRS’s values.

To be eligible to become a director, you must be a member in good standing for a period of at least one month and be a minimum of 19 years of age. Potential candidates must submit an application to be assessed by the nomination committee.

There are three director positions to fill starting December 2014, for a one-year term. Voting will take place at the Annual General Meeting Dec. 16, 2014 at the Comox Valley Exhibition Grounds and in the CV Therapeutic Riding Lounge. Nomination forms must be received by CVTRS on or before Dec. 8 and are available by contacting CVTRS at 250-338-1968 or email cvtrs@telus.net.

 

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