Comox Valley Nature Invites the public to learn about geology of the Comox Valley

Along river banks and beaches of the Comox Valley, a jumbled record of ancient volcanic activity, forgotten swamps and domineering ice sheets presents itself in the form of cobbles. Some of these have traveled thousands of kilometres over hundreds of millions of years to find themselves under your feet. This talk will present a new guide to the identification and interpretation of cobbles in our region with a focus on the geological history and the processes that formed these rocks.

Comox Valley Nature is hosting a public lecture about the geology of the Comox Valley. Join geologist Randal Mindell for an illustrated talk entitled: Cobbling together the Deep History of the Comox Valley.

The lecture is on Sunday, March 18 at 7 p.m. in the Rotary Room of the Filberg Seniors Centre at 411 Anderton Ave. in Courtenay.

Mindell is a paleobotanist with a keen interest in living and fossil plants. He completed his undergraduate at UBC in earth and ocean science and a PhD at the University of Alberta in biology. He has worked at the UBC Botanical Garden, and lectured at UBC and at Douglas College before moving to the Comox Valley.

This is an opportunity for the public to learn more about the interesting geology of our area.

Comox Valley Nature is a non-profit society affiliated to BC Nature consisting only of unpaid volunteers. CVN fulfills its educational mandate by hosting monthly lectures, organizing free weekly guided hikes for members, and a free monthly walk open to the public. Comox Valley Nature also supports specialized groups (Birding, Botany, Garry Oak Restoration, Wetland Restoration, Photography and Young Naturalists Club) which have separate monthly activities. Membership in BC Nature and Comox Valley Nature is $30 per adult and $40 for a family.

Founded in 1966, it is one of the oldest environmental societies on the North Island. Meetings and lectures of the Comox Valley Naturalists Society are held on the third Sunday of most months at the Florence Filberg Centre, 411 Anderton, Courtenay. Meetings and guided walks are open to the public, including children and youth. Lecture is free, though a $4 contribution from non-members is appreciated. New memberships are always welcomed.

Anyone interested in this lecture or participating in CVNS activities can visit http://comoxvalleynaturalist.bc.ca/

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