Couple sets aside land for Garry oaks

After a long drought Comox Valley Nature is renewing its drive to plant 2,250 Garry oaks.

NICK AND ANNA Guthrie have set aside a one-third of an acre triangle of their sheep farm to plant a Garry oak grove of 40 trees.

After the longest drought on record that lasted from July to October, Comox Valley Nature is renewing its drive to plant 2,250 Garry oaks in the Comox Valley from Ships Point to Campbell River.

This drought was consistent with the kind of extreme events forecast by climate change modellers for the past two decades. It is also consistent with the kind of drier climate cycle that prevailed in B.C. prior to 1750, when Garry oak ecosystems were at their height in the Comox Valley and still covered over 15 square miles of savannah in 1860.

As expected, Garry oaks planted before the drought and water table draw down have weathered these temperature extremes.  Garry oaks are a tree species with a massive taproot system that makes them excellently adapted to the climate extremes of both flood and drought.

Renewing these heritage trees is now an investment in our children’s future. It is not just an elegant tree, it is commonsense stewardship.

Comox Valley Nature wishes to publicly congratulate Nick and Anna Guthrie for setting aside a one-third of an acre triangle of their sheep farm to plant a Garry oak grove of 40 trees, which they plan to hand down to their grandchildren.

At a time when the once-glorious Garry Oak ecosystems of the Comox Valley have been reduced to less than one per cent of their extent, this generous act is a wise and priceless use of private land for the public good.

The demise of the Garry oak system is largely caused by the fact that Vancouver Islands Garry oak ecosystems overlap with the private land base, which is being rapidly developed. The problem therefore needs to be addressed by working with private landowners. If we plant now, we can reverse the rapid disappearance of this heritage.

The Guthries are being joined by many landowners — but many more are still needed. If you are interested, you should contact Comox Valley Nature’s Garry oak restoration program at http://comoxvalleynaturalist.bc.ca or by calling Loys Maingon (CVN president) at 250-331-0143.

The program provides various local Garry oaks specific to one of five regional genetic populations. The site is visited by a professional biologist to assess feasibility and growing potential.  Trees planted are registered and mapped, and form part of an ongoing climate change monitoring experiment.

— Comox Valley Nature

Just Posted

MusicFest weekend in the Comox Valley ‘fantastic’

With clear skies and warm temperatures bathing the crowd at the Comox… Continue reading

Riverfront proposal in Comox Valley remains on hold

Directors consider application a standard amendment

Island Health announces addition of 38 beds for seniors care in the Comox Valley

17 beds at Comox Valley hospital; 21 beds at St. Joe’s

VIDEO: North Island Hospital heliport flight testing

Island Health, in conjunction with Helijet, tested the heliports Tuesday as part… Continue reading

Campfire ban coming into effect across West Coast

The Coastal Fire Centre says bans will begin on Wednesday

Trudeau asks transport minister to tackle Greyhound’s western pullout

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he’s asked Transport Minister Marc Garneau to find solutions in Greyhound Canada’s absence.

Bob Castle’s Under the Glacier cartoon for July 19, 2018

Bob Castle’s Under the Glacier cartoon for July 19, 2018… Continue reading

Hells Angels celebrating 35th anniversary party on Vancouver Island

Additional police resources will be in Nanaimo this weekend as roughly 300 members and hang arounds are expected

New campaign aims to tide food waste at home

About 2.2 million tonnes of edible food is discarded in Canada every year

B.C. couple reunited with dog three years after disappearance

A purebred Pomeranian is back with his parents, likely after years in a puppy mill.

BC Nurses Union calls for decriminalization of opioids

BCNU president wants the federal government to do more to reduce preventable deaths

Kitten OK after being rescued from underground pipe in B.C.

An adventurous feline has been rescued after getting trapped in an underground pipe in Kamloops, B.C.

A day after back-tracking, Trump defends summit performance

Amid bipartisan condemnation of his embrace of a longtime U.S. enemy, Trump at first sought to end 27 hours of recrimination by delivering a rare admission of error Tuesday.

Thai soccer players rescued from cave meet the media

Members of the Thai youth soccer team who were trapped in a cave have left the hospital where they have been treated since their rescue.

Most Read