Courtenay Mayor Bob Wells presents Marla Ayre and her children Hunter, and Marissa, with the keys to their new home at the Habitat For Humanity Vancouver Island North’s Lake Trail Road project. Photo by Terry Farrell

Elementary students can help Habitat For Humanity Vancouver Island North through writing contest

Students in Grades 4, 5, and 6 in the Comox Valley and Campbell River can help Habitat for Humanity build homes by writing about what home means to them.

This year’s Meaning of Home contest launched on Jan. 6, with submissions accepted online and by mail until Feb. 21.

Last year, the participation of local youth resulted in a $5,000 grant from Genworth towards Habitat for Humanity Vancouver Island North’s build projects in both communities. Participating teachers and students were invited to attend local Habitat key ceremonies, where several students read their entries in front of the audience.

Founded by Genworth Canada in 2007, the Meaning of Home contest has raised over $1.5 million dollars towards helping build decent and affordable housing in communities across Canada. Last year, over 8,000

Grades 4, 5 and 6 students from across Canada shared what home means to them and this year, Habitat for Humanity Canada is hoping for a record-breaking 10,000 submissions. Three grand prize winners, one from each grade, will receive a $30,000 grant to be directed to the local Habitat build of their choice. Nine runners up, three from each grade, will win a $10,000 grant towards a local Habitat build. Every student entry earns a $10 donation towards that student’s local Habitat for Humanity ensuring that communities benefit from each student’s participation.

“The Meaning of Home contest engages students to think critically about the importance of safe and affordable housing,” said Tom Beshr, Habitat VIN’s director of development. “You’re never too young to give back to the community, and the creativity and thoughtfulness of our local students inspires us every year.”

“The Genworth Canada Meaning of Home contest encourages students to become engaged in the well-being of their community. As a founding sponsor of this contest, we’ve provided over $1.5 million in funding to Habitat for Humanity across Canada, and we have helped to inspire 58,000 students to learn more about the issue of affordable housing,” said Stuart Levings, president and CEO, Genworth Canada.

Teachers or parents who are interested in having their Grade 4, 5 or 6 students participate can also access an educational module online at meaningofhome.ca that includes writing tips and information on affordable housing issues in Canada.

Sign up to get on-going updates and notification of the winners at meaningofhome.ca. Winners of the 2020 Meaning of Home contest will be announced in May.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

ILO-ILO, King George owner questions Cumberland buildings’ future

Council members discuss building options such as theatre, boutique hotel as heritage sites

Valley students adapt to COVID restrictions while competing in online world championship

Students were tasked to create a story using visual effects and deliver a performance using Zoom

Airforce search and rescue helicopter drops in at Cameron Lake for training

Distinctive yellow CH-149 Cormorant turns heads after using Island lake for impromptu hoist

Captive fawn seized from Cumberland home

Valley resident charged and fined under the Wildlife Act

Filmmaker James Cameron’s Comox Valley winery up for sale

The director behind The Terminator and Titanic puts Beaufort Winery on the market after six years

‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds calls on young British Columbians to be COVID-smart

‘Deadpool’ celebrity responds to premier’s call for social influence support

Captain Horvat’s OT marker lifts Canucks to 4-3 win over Blues

Vancouver takes 2-0 lead in best-of-7 NHL playoff series with St. Louis

Widow of slain Red Deer doctor thanks community for support ahead of vigil

Fellow doctors, members of the public will gather for a physically-distanced vigil in central Alberta

Protesters showcase massive old yellow cedar as Port Renfrew area forest blockade continues

9.5-foot-wide yellow cedar measured by Ancient Forest Alliance campaigners in Fairy Creek watershed

Taking dog feces and a jackhammer to neighbourhood dispute costs B.C. man $16,000

‘Pellegrin’s actions were motivated by malice …a vindictive, pointless, dangerous and unlawful act’

Racist stickers at Keremeos pub leaves group uneasy and angry

The ‘OK’ hand gesture is a known hate-symbol

VIDEO: World responds to B.C. girl after pandemic cancels birthday party

Dozens of cards and numerous packages were delivered to six-year-old Charlie Manning

Expected fall peak of COVID-19 in Canada could overwhelm health systems: Tam

National modelling projections released Friday show an expected peak in cases this fall

Most Read