Palestinian family to arrive Oct. 31 in Comox Valley

A Palestinian family —Ali, Laila, Reem, Mariam, and Rana Abo-Nofal — will leave the United Nations desert camp in northern Syria and will arrive in Comox on Oct. 31, says the Refugee Support Committee in the Comox Valley.

A Palestinian family —Ali, Laila, Reem, Mariam, and Rana Abo-Nofal — will leave the United Nations desert camp in northern Syria and will arrive in Comox on Oct. 31, says the Refugee Support Committee in the Comox Valley.

This is a month earlier than expected, says Dave Talbot of the Refugee Support Committee.

“Our main need is financial,” he explains. “We are one-quarter of the way to raising the $30,000 required to bring the family to the Valley and support them for a year.  We are reaching out to everyone and asking you to please help provide a country, a community and a home for this family.

“They have lost so much, suffered so much, have never had citizenship in a country and have lived in a tent in the desert for the last four years. Here is an opportunity to really make a difference, one that you will be able to see first hand, as you transform the lives of five people forever. Let’s reach out and offer hope as towns and cities are doing across Canada.”

The committee would like to hear from anyone in the Comox Valley who speaks Arabic or knows someone who does.

The committee wants to find a home in the Courtenay Elementary School area and furnish it. For a list of household items that are still required, phone Raymond at 250-339-9278 or visit  www.cvrefugeesupport.blogspot.com.

A fundraising dessert and dance Oct. 29 at the Lower Elks hall will feature popular eclectic band Flying Debris. Book your $25 tickets by phoning Bev at 250-897-0992.

The committee is canvassing the Valley, and could really do with more support to get the word out. If you have some time and could take a fundraising packet around to your neighbours, workmates, businesses, friends, call Deb at 250-331-9050. Gift certificates and items for a silent auction are being accepted.

For cash donations, make cheques out to Comox United Church, put Refugee Fund on the memo line and mail to Comox United Church, 250 Beach Dr., Comox, B.C. V9M 1P9. All contributions over $20 will receive an income tax receipt.

E-mail any questions to cvrefugees@yahoo.ca or call Dave at 250-339-4975.

The next meeting for the Refugee Support Committee is Oct. 19 at 7 p.m. at Comox United Church.

— Refugee Support Committee

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