You could witness historic moment as Kómoks sign agreement

The K’όmoks First Nation (KFN) and the National Historic Site Committee (NHSC) invite all Comox Valley residents to take part in an historic signing ceremony.

The signing is a celebration between KFN and the NHSC to launch a community bid for National Historic Site Status for the ancient aboriginal fish trap systems in the estuary.

THE CROWD ADMIRES the I-Hos Canoe at the Day of the Estuary.

THE CROWD ADMIRES the I-Hos Canoe at the Day of the Estuary.

The K’όmoks First Nation (KFN) and the National Historic Site Committee (NHSC) invite all Comox Valley residents to take part in an historic signing ceremony.

The signing is a celebration between KFN and the NHSC to launch a community bid for National Historic Site Status for the ancient aboriginal fish trap systems in the estuary.

In addition, the board of directors of the Comox Valley Project Watershed Society and the KFN have reached a Memorandum of Agreement to work together for the protection and preservation of the Courtenay River estuary.

The event will be held this Sunday at the Puntledge RV Campground on Condensory Road at the upland end of the estuary.

The event will start at 3 p.m. with a welcome and traditional dancing by the Kumugwe Dancers. This will be followed by the signing ceremony at 3:30 p.m. Emily Spiller, the Vancouver Island 2011 female vocalist of the year will perform at 4 p.m. and again at 5 p.m.

The announcement of the official bid for National Historic Site Status for the Estuary Fish Trap Systems will be made at 4:30 p.m.

In addition, the afternoon will feature aboriginal art vendors, traditional First Nations food, Project Watershed displays on the estuary, the KFN I-Hos canoe and more.

“We hope the entire community can join us for this historic celebration,” say Paul Horgen, chair of the Historic Site Committee and of the board of directors of Project Watershed, and Melissa Quocksister, KFN member on the Historic Site Committee.

— Project Watershed