23rd World Community Film Festival tickets now on sale

Deemed "the largest social issues filmfest in B.C.," the film festival hosts the finest documentaries from around the world

An opportunity to travel the world and experience first-hand the challenges, triumphs and hopes of others living in the global village awaits you.

Tickets are now on sale for the 23rd World Community Film Festival on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 in downtown Courtenay.

Deemed “the largest social issues filmfest in B.C.,” the film festival hosts the finest documentaries from around the world exploring themes such as food security, environmental issues, social justice and human rights, labour issues, arts and music.

These films are guaranteed to entertain, inform, and inspire you.

From the opening-night offerings, Project Heart; Honouring Residential School Survivors and Sweet Dreams, an intimate look at how Rwandan women empower themselves, to the power of music and theatre in the closing night film, Al Helm; MLK in Palestine, the program is packed with a strong lineup including many award-winners and positive films.

With films showing simultaneously in four different venues, Saturday hosts a full day of viewing, including a family film program in the afternoon.

One of the biggest challenges is deciding which films to see. Plan your viewing by checking out the film trailers and schedule online at www.worldcommunity.ca.

When not viewing films, visit the bazaar in the upper Florence Filberg Centre where community groups will give out information or sell merchandise related to the various issues raised during the festival. It’s also a great place to relax and have a snack.

Admission to the bazaar is free.

Some low-income passes are available. For tickets, call the Sid Williams Theatre box office (250-338-2430 or toll-free 1-866-898-8499) or order online www.sidwilliamstheatre.com (a $2 ticket-processing fee will be added to the ticket price).

The World Community Film Festival is a project of the World Community Development Education Society.

— World Community Development Education Society

Just Posted

BREAKING: Large structure fire at downtown Courtenay hostel

A fire in downtown Courtenay has engulfed the Cona Hostel at the… Continue reading

Affordable rental housing complex opens in Courtenay

The Braidwood facility will house 34 people at risk of homelessness

Applications open for record bursary, scholarship funding at North Island College

Current and future North Island College students can now apply for scholarships… Continue reading

Second Stage Players present laughter and love in We Are Family

Get your tickets early to see the Evergreen Club’s Second Stage Players’… Continue reading

Stolen Bentley spotted going wrong way down highway found in Summerland

The car has been recorded going the wrong way on the Coquihalla, found two days later

Comox Valley Hospice Society finds new Ocean Front home

Comox Valley Hospice Society (CVHS) recently announced plans to construct a new… Continue reading

1,300 cruise ship passengers rescued by helicopter amid storm off Norway’s coast

Rescue teams with helicopters and boats were sent to evacuate the cruise ship under extremely difficult circumstances

B.C. university to offer first graduate program on mindfulness in Canada

University of the Fraser Valley says the mostly-online program focuses on self-care and well being

Province announces $18.6 million for B.C. Search and Rescue

The funding, spread over three years, to pay for operations, equipment, and training

Late-season wave of the flu makes its round in B.C.

BC Centre for Disease Control reported 50 per cent jump in flu cases in first weeks of March

Tofino’s housing crisis causing some to seek shelter at the local hospital

Tofino’s housing crisis is pushing the town’s ‘hidden homeless’ population into the forefront.

Sentencing judge in Broncos crash calls for carnage on highways to end

Judge Inez Cardinal sentenced Jaskirat Singh Sidhu to eight years

2 fires in Victoria caused by cigarettes prompts warning from deputy fire chief

Two separate fires caused by cigarette butts were avoidable

Most Read