Award-winning author Jane Eaton Hamilton in Fanny Bay

Jane Eaton Hamilton's latest book is Love Will Burst into a Thousand Shapes.

Headlining at this month’s Fat Oyster Reading Series is CBC Literary Award author Jane Eaton Hamilton.

She is a two-time first prize winner of the CBC Literary Awards most recently in 2014.

Along with fellow authors Maleea Acker, David Fraser and Patricia Smekal, Hamilton will be reading at the Fanny Bay Hall on Wednesday, April 29.

The Fat Oyster does it again with a wonderful line-up of authors this month.

Hamilton is author of eight books, most recently the poetry collection Love Will Burst into a Thousand Shapes (2014). This work has been described as intimate, sexy, grief-stricken, witty and urbane.

She has written for the Globe and Mail, Macleans, the New York Times and many other magazines and journals; and has won numerous literary and arts awards.

Joining her is Maleea Acker, an author and teacher who is completing a PhD in cultural geography at the University of Victoria. Acker’s most recent book, Air-Proof Green (2013), is a collection of poetry that crosses continents and asks the essential question, How do we live in the world? Her previous book, Gardens Aflame: Garry Oak Meadows on BC’s South Coast (2012), is a wonderful book that examines her relationship to the Garry Oak forest, and has been described as a lyrical and ethical parable. Her poetry and non-fiction has been published by numerous literary journals. She is a director for the Garry Oak Ecosystems Recovery Team.

Patricia Smekal and David Fraser will be reading from their recent book, Maybe We Could Dance, A Collaboration of Response Poems. Each live on opposite sides of Northwest Bay in Nanoose. This collection represents a wonderful collaborative process in which one author would respond to the other’s writing from across the bay.

This promises to be a lively spoken-word performance.

This delightful Fat Oyster reading will be on Wednesday, April 29 at 7 p.m. at the Fanny Bay Hall.

Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

The cost is by donation at the door.

For more information please see the Fanny Bay Hall website at bit.ly/1zHWBGD and look for the Fat Oyster Reading page on Facebook.

 

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