‘Charismatic performer’ returning to Comox Valley

In a darkened bedroom, lit only be the amber glow from an old floor model radio, two young brothers aged six and 12 lay in their beds, listening to the country music broadcasts from the Grand Ol’ Opry, and practised their harmonies.

TROUBADOUR GARNET ROGERS sings Wednesday at Cumberland United Church.

TROUBADOUR GARNET ROGERS sings Wednesday at Cumberland United Church.

In a darkened bedroom, lit only be the amber glow from an old floor model radio, two young brothers aged six and 12 lay in their beds, listening to the country music broadcasts from the Grand Ol’ Opry, and practised their harmonies.

Two years later, the youngest one was playing the definitive eight-year-old’s version of Desolation Row on his ukulele. He soon abandoned that instrument to teach himself the flute, violin and guitar.

Within 10 years, and barely out of high school, Garnet Rogers was on the road as a full- time working musician with his older brother Stan. Together, they formed what has come to be accepted as one of the most influential acts in North American folk music.

Since then, Garnet has established himself as “one of the major talents of our time.”

Hailed by the Boston Globe as a “charismatic performer and singer,” Garnet is a man with a powerful physical presence — close to six and a half feet tall — with a voice to match. With his “smooth, dark baritone” (Washington Post), his incredible range and thoughtful, dramatic phrasing, Garnet is widely considered by fans and critics alike to be one of the finest singers anywhere.

His music, like the man himself, is literate, passionate, highly sensitive and deeply purposeful. Cinematic in detail, his songs “give expression to the unspoken vocabulary of the heart” (Kitchener Waterloo Record).

An optimist at heart, Garnet sings extraordinary songs about people who are not obvious heroes and of the small victories of the everyday. As memorable as his songs, his over-the-top humour and lightning-quick wit moves his audience from tears to laughter and back again.

Resolutely independent, Garnet Rogers has turned down offers from major labels to do his music his own way.

The legendary singer-songwriter is returning to Cumberland on Sept. 28 to perform at Cumberland United Church at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $20 in advance at Bop City Records, Tarbells and online at store@cumberlandvillageworks.com, or $25 at the door. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

— Cumberland Village Works

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Mark Stuart, president of Upland Contracting presents Wayne White, conservation chair, Courtenay and District Fish and Game Protective Association with a cheque for $26,000 to help fund the hatchery C&DF&GPA is planning to build this year. Photo supplied.
Upland Contracting Ltd. donates $26K to the Courtenay Fish and Game hatchery project

Upland Contracting has donated $26,250 to the Courtenay and District Fish and… Continue reading

Dr. Bonnie Henry, provincial health officer, updates British Columbians about COVID-19 at a press conference earlier this week. (B.C. Government image)
B.C.’s 1st case of COVID-19 confirmed a year ago today

Here’s a look at some of the key dates in the province’s fight against the novel coronavirus

Courtenay council
City of Courtenay receives $4 million Safe Restart Grant

In the fall, the City of Courtenay received a $4.149 million ‘COVID-19… Continue reading

A single-vehicle motor vehicle incident slowed traffic on Highway 19A Wednesday afternoon.
Single-vehicle motor vehicle incident causes delays in Courtenay

Roads were wet with a mixture of snow and rain falling throughout the day

Flowers poke through the snow in Courtenay as the area got a taste of winter weather this week. Photo by Erin Haluschak
Valley not out of the winter woods quite yet: meteorologist

“It’s winter; we’ve got to get through it together.”

British Columbia Health Minister Adrian Dix looks on as Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry addresses the media during a news conference at the BC Centre of Disease Control in Vancouver B.C. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)
B.C. announces 485 new COVID-19 cases, fewest deaths in months

‘The actions we take may seem small, but will have a big impact to stop the virus,” urges Dr. Henry

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Grad student Marisa Harrington and her supervisor Lynneth Stuart-Hill say preliminary results from a study into the affects of stress on hospital nurses show an impact on sleep and heart variability. (Courtesy of Marisa Harrington)
University of Victoria study shows stress impact on B.C. nurses

Stress may be impacting sleep, heart health of hospital nurses in Victoria region

Sooke’s Amy McLaughlin holds Theodore, a bunny who will be going to a new owner in Nanaimo within the coming days if all goes will at an upcoming bunny play-date. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
Vancouver Island woman looking to hop into bigger space for bunny rescue operation

Amy McLaughlin has rescued more than 400 bunnies, pushing for the capacity to help more

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News
Search called off for small plane that went down in rough water south of Victoria

Plane bound for Port Angeles from Alaska believed to have one occupant, an Alaskan pilot

Royal B.C. Museum conservator Megan Doxsey-Whitfield kneels next to a carved stone pillar believed to have significance as a First Nations cultural marker by local Indigenous people. The pillar was discovered on the beach at Dallas Road last summer. Museum curatorial staff have been working with Songhees and Esquimalt Nation representatives to gain a clearer picture of its use. (Photo courtesy Royal BC Museum)
Stone carving found on Victoria beach confirmed Indigenous ritual pillar

Discussion underway with the Esquimalt and Songhees about suitable final home for the artifact

Former Vancouver Giants forward Evander Kane is seen here in Game 7 of the second round of the 2009 WHL playoffs against the Spokane Chiefs (Sam Chan under Wikipedia Commons licence)
Gambling debts revealed in details of bankruptcy filing by hockey star Evander Kane

Sharks left winger and former Vancouver Giants player owes close to $30 million total

Othman “Adam” Hamdan, pictured in front of Christina Lake’s Welcome Centre, was acquitted of terrorism related charges in 2017. He has been living in Christina Lake since November 2020. Photo: Laurie Tritschler
Man acquitted on terrorism charges awaits deportation trial while living in Kootenays

Othman Ayed Hamdan said he wants to lead a normal life while he works on his upcoming book

B.C. Premier John Horgan wears a protective face mask to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 prior to being sworn in by The Honourable Janet Austin, Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia during a virtual swearing in ceremony in Victoria, Thursday, November 26, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Premier Horgan calls jumping COVID vaccine queue ‘un-Canadian’

Horgan says most people in B.C. are doing their best to follow current public health guidelines

Most Read