Favourite jazz standards anything but forbidden

The Forbidden Jazz Trio returns to Zocalo Café this Sunday for a special matinée performance.

BASSIST GRAHAM EDWARDS and vocalist-trumpeter jake Masri will perform Sunday with Forbidden Jazz.

BASSIST GRAHAM EDWARDS and vocalist-trumpeter jake Masri will perform Sunday with Forbidden Jazz.

The Forbidden Jazz Trio returns to Zocalo Café this Sunday for a special matinée performance.

The group, consisting of Jake Masri on trumpet and vocals, Jim Chew on guitar and Grahame Edwards on upright bass, hope to reach audiences of all ages by performing a wide variety of favourite jazz standards.

Representing more than four decades of experience, their unique blend of voice, brass and strings promise to weave their collective magic through two sets of entertaining music.

Joining the trio on lead guitar is Jim Chew. Jim has explored all areas of music over the past 35 years, from trios to show bands, both live and in the studio.

During his teens, Jim was inspired by Django Reinhardt, and went on to study classical guitar for three years. He eventually discovered a passion for jazz, which led him on a path of playing and teaching in the jazz program at Mount Royal College in Calgary. When he wasn’t playing jazz, he supplemented his income as a commercial freelance musician.

This experience left him with a broad base of influences, which he can now apply to his playing style. Jim resides in Campbell River and performs with the CR Little Big Band.

Talented multi-instrumentalist Grahame Edwards studied music at the University of British Columbia and holds a diploma in fine arts from the University of Calgary.

Aside from electric and acoustic bass, Grahame also plays percussion and trumpet. He has appeared with countless local ensembles and productions in every genre from choral to musical theatre, big band jazz to classical.

His first musical love, however, lies with improvised music and he enjoys playing and composing his own jazz tunes. In addition to performing, Grahame has taught privately and in the Campbell River School District, and enjoys sharing his music through conducting workshops and clinics.

Over the years, he has studied with many respected jazz musicians including Don Clarke, Phil Nimmons, Chris Nelson, and Paul Horn.

No stranger to the local music scene, Jake Masri draws his inspiration from classical repertoire to musical theater to Afro-Cuban/New Orleans, and bebop styles. His passion for jazz is directly linked to artists such as Harry James, Miles Davis, Chet Baker and Arturo Sandoval.

As a performance major at VCC, UVIC and UBC, Jake studied trumpet with Boyd Hood, Gerald Gerbrecht and trombonist Dave Robbins. His studies in jazz exposed him to pros such as Mike Herriot, Bill Clarke and Hugh Fraser during the local CYMC summer program.

Among his favourite vocal instructors are Ann Mortifee, Rhiannon, Ysaye Barnwell and Wendy Nixon Stothert. Since moving to Comox in 2002, Jake has appeared with Quintessence Brass; 6th Street, Jazztown, and Jazz Noir combos; Sounds of 17, Georgia Straight, Arrowsmith and CR Big Bands; Strathcona Symphony Orchestra, and Just in Time Jazz Choir.

You’re invited to join Forbidden Jazz for a casual, entertaining evening. Music commences at 2 p.m. and admission is by donation.

For more information, contact Zocalo Café & Gallery at 250-331-0933, visit www.zocalocafe.ca or simply drop by the corner of Fifth Street and Cliffe Avenue in downtown Courtenay.

— Forbidden Jazz Trio

 

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