Gordie MacKeeman and His Rhythm Boys play the Sid Williams Theatre Friday.

Gordie diggin’ in his heels at the Sid

Gordie MacKeeman and His Rhythm Boys on Nov. 20 at the Sid

Mark Allan

Special to The Record

Gordie MacKeeman has famous crazy legs.

If you don’t believe it, come to an evening with MacKeeman and His Rhythm Boys on Nov. 20 at the Sid Williams Theatre.

“That’s for my dancing,” the Prince Edward Island fiddler admits about the crazy legs referenced in a press release.

“The style of dancing I do is clogging as well as traditional step dance, kind of a mixture of the two,” MacKeeman explains in an interview from PEI. “Crowds usually react to the dancing for sure.”

MacKeeman attempts to explain why the Maritimes have such a strong cultural identity, particularly with the region’s music.

“We’re a little more secluded out this way … and you see a lot of families down this way; there’s some families that every single person plays. A lot of times there’ll be after-parties in somebody’s kitchen.

“Anywhere you go, there seems to be a lot of music.”

MacKeeman says there aren’t truly distinct regional styles within Maritimes music with the possible exception of one part of Nova Scotia.

“Especially in the Celtic music you hear, sometimes the Cape Breton fiddlers will have a slightly different style of playing.”

Unlike the sound of other Maritime fiddlers, MacKeeman’s style is not dominated by Celtic influences.

“The style of fiddling I do mainly is Down East style. I was influenced when I was younger by a lot of players like (New Brunswick old-time player) Ned Landry, (Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame inductee) Al Cherny, (1960s Canadian music icon) Don Messer. So not quite as much on the Celtic side, more on the Down East side.”

Besides combining two forms of dancing, MacKeeman and His Rhythm Boys incorporate several musical styles into their crowd-pleasing sound.

“I would say everything we do is a good mix of everyone. There’s a lot of input from everybody in the band.

“I like old-time country and old-time fiddling stuff … we all like rockabilly and bluegrass. We just kind of fall under that roots umbrella.”

Mark Geddes (bass, drums, percussion, mandolin and banjo), Thomas Webb (vocals, banjo, guitar, pedal steel guitar and bass) and Peter Cann (vocals and guitar) are MacKeeman’s Rhythm Boys.

They celebrated their fifth anniversary together Oct. 1.

“We’re all basically best friends, and we’ve been travelling together for quite awhile now.”

Their high-energy, crowd-pleasing live show is equally by design and just because that’s what happens when they play to an audience.

“We really put a lot of concentration on making the show entertaining for an audience, but I think people can tell how well we get along onstage and that we love to play.

“We have a lot of people say after the show that they love the energy of it just as much as the music.”

MacKeeman and the Boys shouldn’t be nervous playing to a Sid crowd after performing at England’s Glastonbury Festival, which attracts 250,000 fans.

Their album Pickin’ n Clickin’ was voted the 2014 Roots Traditional Group Recording of the Year, the latest in a long line of East Coast Music Awards.

They were also awarded the Galaxie Supernova Award at the 2012 Ottawa Folk Festival for an outstanding, high-energy performance.

Gordie MacKeeman and His Rhythm Boys perform Nov. 20 at the Sid Williams Theatre in Courtenay as part of the Sid’s Blue Circle Series. For details and tickets, visit  sidwilliamstheatere.com, phone 250-338-2430 or visit the Sid box office at 442 Cliffe Ave.

 

Just Posted

Land & Sea Brewing Company opens its doors in Comox

Managing director says the brewery will be a compliment to the Valley’s craft beer scene

Two Courtenay Habitat for Humanity families receive keys to new homes

Lake Trail Road project officially has residents

Preparations ongoing for Courtenay’s annual Earl Naswell Community Christmas Dinner

The doors of the Florence Filberg Centre, downtown Courtenay, will open again… Continue reading

Valley woman found guilty on three charges following 2016 collision in Courtenay

The woman involved in a trial for a multi-vehicle collision in which… Continue reading

Swiss juniors train in Comox Valley

The Swiss national junior hockey team is training at the Comox Valley… Continue reading

GoFundMe helps Vancouver Island teen battle a rare cancer

Nanaimo’s Michelle Reilly, 16, battling spinal cord cancer, seeking possible treatment in U.S.

Canada’s ambassador meets with second detainee in China

Global Affairs says John McCallum, Canada’s ambassador to China, met with Spavor Sunday

‘They’re coming:’ Flying cars may appear in urban skies by 2023

Air taxis will number 15,000 and become a global market worth $32 billion by 2035

B.C. VIEWS: Andrew Wilkinson on taxes, ICBC and union changes

Opposition leader sees unpredictable year ahead in 2019

5 tips for self-care, mental wellness this holiday season

Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions urging British Columbians to prioritize self care through festive season

Rescued B.C. cat with misshapen legs in need of forever home – with carpet

Mirielle was born with misshapen back legs and after a tough life on the streets, is looking for a forever home.

VIDEO: Craft growers will add to recreational market, cannabis producer says

Two B.C. men say their expertise in running small legal medical grow-ops a benefit to recreational market

World Sikh Organization demands Canada prove Sikh extremism is a threat

Sikh community says this is first time such extremism has been mentioned in federal terror-threat assessment

Most Read