(Pixabay)

‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘Shining’ added to National Film Registry

“These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

The National Film Registry is turning 30 and will bring in a new crop of films ranging from dinosaurs’ return from extinction, a cowboys-in-love drama and stories showcasing Native Americans.

The Library of Congress announced Wednesday that the films “Jurassic Park,” ”Brokeback Mountain” and “My Fair Lady” are among the 25 movies tapped for preservation this year.

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“These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams,” Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress, said in a statement.

The national library chose a few more memorable titles such as “The Shining,” ”Eve’s Bayou” ”Hud” and “Broadcast News.” Others on the list include 1898 film “Something Good – Negro Kiss” and “Smoke Signals” from 1998, along with animated films “Hair Piece: A Film for Nappy-Headed People” (1984) and “Cinderella” (1950).

The library selected movies for preservation because of their cultural, historic and artist importance since the registry began in 1988. This year’s picks bring the total number of films in the registry to 750.

“Brokeback Mountain,” released in 2005, is the newest film on the registry. The Oscar-winning film delved into the tragic tale of two cowboys who fall in love and starred Jake Gyllenhaal and the late Heath Ledger.

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Ang Lee, director of the film, said he never intended for “Brokeback Mountain” to make a statement, but simply wanted to tell a love story.

“To my great surprise, the film ended up striking a deep chord with audiences; the movie became a part of the culture, a reflection of the darkness and light — of violent prejudice and enduring love — in the rocky landscape of the American heart,” Lee said in a statement.

Steven Spielberg’s 1993 original “Jurassic Park” was a blockbuster and the top public vote-getter to make its way into the registry this year.

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Several films showcased the ethnic diversity of American cinema: “Smoke Signals” (1998) and “Dixon-Wanamaker Expedition to Crow Agency” (1908) explored the culture of Native Americans.

Other additions include “”Days of Wine and Roses” (1962), “Bad Day at Black Rock” (1955), “The Girl Without a Soul” (1917), “Hearts and Minds” (1974), “The Informer” (1935), “The Lady From Shanghai” (1947), “Leave Her to Heaven” (1945), “Monterey Pop” (1968), “The Navigator” (1924), “On the Town” (1949), “One-Eyed Jacks” (1961), “Pickup on South

The Associated Press

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