Three artists converge for Denman Art Centre’s final show of summer

A sculptor, a poet and a recycled materials artist combine for the Denman Arts Centre’s final show of its summer series.

Butterfly Window is a sample of John Tansley’s work.

A sculptor, a poet and a recycled materials artist combine for the Denman Arts Centre’s final show of its summer series.

Sculptor John Tansley presents “Collage,” while life partners Ted Goodden and Cornelia Hoogland present “Book of Changes”.

The three-artist show runs Aug. 18-30.

Collage

John Tansley spent his childhood on the Prairies, but since then has resided here on the coast of B.C.  In 1978 he graduated from Emily Carr College, where sculpture was his major. His work has been shown in Vancouver, at Burnaby’s Shadbolt Centre and in galleries on the Sunshine Coast.

And now we have the privilege of seeing Tansley’s work here on Denman Island, where he spends much of his time.

Seeking out picture frames, maps, posters and other articles such as books, inspires Tansley to become creative with these recycled materials.

He also uses decorative paper which becomes the background for the found paper materials that he transforms, often into origami shapes.

Much of the decorative paper is translucent, then layered to give glimpses of a contrasting layer beneath.

Some assemblages have a print-making element, as they are lino-stamped. The end results are truly amazing – whether they are butterflies, birds, buildings or human figures.

“The images and materials juxtaposed surprise me,” said Tansley. “There are butterflies with maps, crows and newspapers, road maps refolded.  They offer pleasure and meaning.”

Book of Changes

Ted Goodden and Cornelia Hoogland live on Hornby Island, are partners in life and for this can be seen in summer at the Hornby Island Farmers’ Market.

As a visual artist of many talents, Ted created line drawings, lino cuts, collages and stained glass windows for his children’s book “Glory Boy”.  And for the last 25 years, Ted has been a sculptor.  He states that he has studied and consulted the I Ching for twice that long.

“The depth of the wisdom contained in the Book of Changes, and its canniness as an oracle, continues to amaze me” he states.

For this show, Ted has created about 30 figurative ceramic sculptures, each one holding a ball.  He then threw a hexagram for each figure. Ted states that he strove for a finish on the clay that would give the impression of antiquity and he achieved that through hand finishing.

Each unique sculpture is self-contained in a glass box and each figure is accompanied by one of Cornelia’s I Ching poems.

Cornelia Hoogland has been writing poetry for most of her life. She has six published books of poetry that have received much recognition.

Cornelia was the founder and artistic director of Poetry London.  As well, she has served on international and national literary boards.

Cornelia explains that her haiku-like, six-line poems “echo the elemental imagery and form, as well as the open-ended interpretability, of the I Ching.

“The poems engage the viewer with a question, and a glimpse into the interior world, or the emotions, of the ceramic figure.”

On Saturday Aug 20, beginning at 1:30, there will be readings at the gallery from authors Amanda Hale, Jennifer Lee, Sussan Thomson and Hoogland.

Cornelia will be reading her I Ching poems and comments that although her poetry will be gracing the walls, it doesn’t come alive until you embody it.

Converse with John, Cornelia and Ted on their opening night, Thursday, Aug. 18 at 7 p.m.  The show, our final one for the season, runs until Tuesday, Aug. 30.

See you at the Denman Arts Centre, 1016 Northwest Road.

Summer gallery hours are:  Monday to Saturday – 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.  Sunday – 1 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

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