Christmas decorating, feng shui style

Yin/Yang balance can be upset by too many Christmas lights at 'dark' time of year

  • Dec. 22, 2011 6:00 p.m.

Terri PerrinSpecial to the Record

This time of year, when the days are short and the nights are long, the sparkle and glow of holiday decorations play an important role in lifting our spirits.

But for some people, an over abundance of holiday décor may be too much of a good thing. The winter solstice — Dec. 22 this year — marks the most Yin or dark time of winter.

By adding Christmas lights, a tree, and a ton of bright red and green decorations, we are intuitively trying to change the ambience of our homes by adding Yang, or bright energy.

The practice of feng shui centres on creating Yin/Yang balance. One of the ways we can do this is by introducing the five natural elements of earth, wood, fire, water and metal in harmony. Each of these elements is represented by a different shape and colour.

The Christmas tree, for example, is a pyramid shape, which represents the fire element. The lights and red decorations we hang on it also represent fire. Whether real or artificial, the green tree itself represents the wood element — and when you add wood to fire — you get more fire!

So, if Christmastime at your home (or office) sparks more arguments than group hugs, you may need to tone down that fire with a little water!

One way we can “add water” is to incorporate glass decorations and mirrors into our holiday decor. Using white, gold or silver can incorporate the metal element. The earth element can be introduced with yellow, gold, and brown.

Changing things up from the traditional red and green can be refreshing, sophisticated and calming. Who knew that the flaming red tablecloth might be what makes some people so grumpy?

Another way to work towards family harmony at Christmas is to put away some of your everyday knick-knacks before you bring out your holiday decorations.

When you simply add items to a room that is already full of decorative accent pieces, you get clutter, which can create chaos.

Fire + clutter + spiked eggnog is a holiday recipe for disaster!

Also be sure that you are only displaying Christmas ornaments that you truly love. If any ornaments have bad memories for you, they act as a beacon of bad tidings and no joy.

“That said, I don’t want people to think they can’t pull out all the stops when it comes to celebrating the Christmas season!” concludes Perrin. “The Christmas tree may represent fire, but it is also a symbol of hope and abundance.

“Wreaths embody vitality and health. Angels symbolize safety and protection. Candles can be a reminder that you need to seek clarity on issues that have been troubling you. And outdoor Christmas lights shining during these long, dark days of winter draw positive energy to your home and family.

“Christmas decorations are great — everywhere except the bedroom — because our bedrooms should be a place of rest, rejuvenation and romance. So go ahead, deck the halls with boughs of holly and have a merry Christmas!”

Terri Perrin of the Fine Art of Intention Feng Shui is a professional feng shui consultant and author based in the Comox Valley. She will be the keynote speaker at the Comox Valley Home-Based Business Association’s general meeting Jan. 5 at the Westerly Hotel.

For details, visit www.faoifengshui.com or call 250-218-4952.

 

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