Driving with one headlight like driving with one eye

The loss of one headlight is the loss of at least half that information and could be the major contribution in an accident

If you have normal vision, would you consider driving with one eye closed at night?

To most people that would seem to be a very foolish question. Why would anyone want to diminish their capability to see while driving?

Take a look at other vehicles on the highway right now. How many of them have only one headlight working? Isn’t that the same as driving with one eye closed?

True, headlights are on a lot more at this time of year and are more apt to burn out. There is also gravel on the road from winter maintenance that contributes to broken headlights.

On the other hand, it is a simple matter to purchase and replace these yourself at minimum expense.

Consider what good headlighting can mean to you. Night driving is essentially moving down a tunnel of light created by your headlights.

That tunnel has to be wide enough and long enough to allow you to detect and react to any driving situation. Your lights also give other drivers information about where you are on the highway.

The loss of one headlight is the loss of at least half that information and could be the major contribution in an accident.

If one headlight is out and you lose the other, what then? Do you drive with no headlights?

Oh, you say, the police will only give me a warning. You may be ticketed for driving with only one headlight and you can expect to be ticketed and parked on the spot for driving with none!

The author is a retired constable with many years of traffic enforcement experience. To comment or learn more, please visit www.drivesmartbc.ca.

We are experiencing technical difficulties with our commenting platform and hope to be up and running again soon. In the meantime, you can still send us your thoughts on Facebook or Twitter, or submit a letter to the editor.