Five reasons to purchase winter tires this season

Winter tires are effective on water as well as snow

Sponsored by Rice Toyota | Impress Branded Content

Let’s face it: Winter driving conditions can be both frustrating and challenging.

Even with milder temperatures here in British Columbia, and fewer snow days than other provinces, it’s hard to predict icy, slippery conditions.

The right tire combined with weather-appropriate driving behaviour significantly increases driving safety.

Here are just five reasons to consider purchasing winter tires this season to keep you and your loved ones safe on the open road.

1. Better performance

It’s a well-known fact that winter tires perform better in colder temperatures. As temperatures drop below 7ºC, the winter tire develops more grip, while the all-season tire loses grip and the summer tire is rendered useless.

2. Longevity

Yes, there’s a cost to having winter tires, but think of it as both a safety and financial investment that will pay off. With a set of both winter and summer tires being used for six months each, both sets of tires will last longer.

3. Better wet-weather traction

Winter tires are designed with slush and snow-pumping tread pattern to deflect the snow away from the tire contact path. This also works with rain-soaked roads.

4. Technology isn’t always everything

If you think electronic driving and traction aids are good enough to keep you safe during the winter, think again. While anti-lock brakes, traction control systems and stability control systems have been developed to help driving in slippery conditions, here’s the bottom line: Your tires are the only part of your vehicle in direct contact with the road. Even four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive can’t help if the tires are not gripping on the road surface.

5. Because the law says so

Winter tires are required here in B.C. on many rural mountain passes in the Interior, north and in areas of Vancouver Island between Oct. 1 and March 31. For a list of highways where winter tires are required, visit www.gov.bc.ca/wintertires.

Note: The minimum requirement is a M + S (Mud and Snow) rating stamped on your tire. Real ‘winter’ tires have mountain and snowflake symbol.

Whether it’s time to replace your tires or get ready for the safe winter drive, Rice Toyota Courtenay offers leading-edge tire technology at competitive prices along with the exceptional service.

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