5 tips for self-care, mental wellness this holiday season

Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions urging British Columbians to prioritize self care through festive season

The end of the year is a joyous time for many, but for some people it can be difficult.

The holiday season can bring added pressures, such as travelling, busy schedules, financial strain, increased expectations and trigger sad memories. These demands can affect people’s well-being, especially for those dealing with loneliness, trauma, grief, mental illness or substance-use challenges.

This year, instead of worrying about finding the perfect gift, attending all the parties or pretending everything is perfect, the ministry for mental health and addictions is reminding British Columbians to make sure they make time to take care of yourself and put your well-being first.

The ministry has released five tips on self care through the holidays:

  1. Talk it out: Just because it’s the holidays does not mean you cannot be honest about how you are feeling. Sometimes talking to a loved one, a trusted friend or a health-care professional can make all the difference.
  2. Do not over-extend yourself: Prioritize your time so you can relax and enjoy the season with people you care about.
  3. Beware of overindulgence: Because alcohol is a depressant, having a few too many spirits can actually dampen your spirit. Also, too many treats can leave you feeling tired and lethargic. Try to maintain your regular eating and sleeping habits as much as possible.
  4. Stay within budget: Finances can become a huge source of stress. Make yourself a budget for the season and stay within it.
  5. Practice stress-busting activities all year: By managing your wellness throughout the year through exercise, meditation, time with friends and family or other activities, you will have an easier time coping with the stressors the festive season can bring.

If you feel like you are in crisis or are considering suicide, please call the Crisis Centre BC suicide hotline at 1-800-784-2433.

Other resources include: Canada Suicide Prevention Service at Toll free: 1-833-456-4566. You can also text 45645 or visit the online chat service at crisisservicescanada.ca.

Some warning signs include suicidal thoughts, anger, recklessness, mood changes, anxiety, lack of purpose, helplessness and substance abuse.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Comox Valley Glacier Kings split another pair of games

Yetis best Buccaneers on Saturday at home after road loss to Storm

Campbell River mom’s iPhone containing priceless photos stolen from Victoria hospital parkade

The phone contained photos, heartbeat recordings of her late son

City of Courtenay installing aqua dam in Lewis Park

With winter approaching, seasonal storms are likely to begin affecting the East… Continue reading

PHOTOS: Ceremony to honour National Day of Remembrance on Dec. 6

The ceremony took place at noon on the plaza outside of the Comox Valley Art Gallery.

Scholarships created in honour of Comox Valley man who died in plane crash

Awards related to indigenous studies and the environment will be offered in memory of Micah Messent

VIDEO: SNL skewers Trudeau’s mockery of Trump in high school cafeteria sketch

The three world leaders won’t let Trump sit at the cool kids’ table

B.C. universities post $340 million worth of surpluses thanks to international student tuition

Students call for spending as international enrolment produces huge surpluses at many universities

Conservatives urge Morneau to deliver ‘urgent’ fall economic update

Morneau says the first thing the Liberals plan to do is bring in their promised tax cut for the middle class

INFOGRAPHIC: How much money did your local university or college make last year?

B.C. university and colleges posted a combined $340 million surplus in 2018/19

B.C. creates $8.5M organization to improve safety for health care workers

Group will bring together unions, province, health care organizations

Kovrig clings to humour as ‘two Michaels’ near one year in Chinese prison

Their detention is widely viewed as retaliation for Canada’s arrest of Chinese high-tech scion Meng Wanzhou

B.C. VIEWS: An engine that hums right along

First Nations are leading a new surge of investment in B.C.

Brain injury from domestic abuse a ‘public health crisis,’ says B.C. researcher

Nearly 80% of the domestic violence victims who reported to police last year were women

Most Read