WestJet hosted almost 1

A Christmas miracle for Fort Mac

For the fifth year in row, WestJet released its annual tear-jerker Christmas video and this year they stayed close to home.



An Albertan community in desperate need of a little magic, got a well-deserved Christmas miracle – thanks to WestJet.

For the fifth year in row, WestJet released its annual tear-jerker Christmas video and this year they stayed close to home.

WestJet went into the community for Fort McMurray and concocted a special surprise for families devastated by the May 2016 wildfire that saw the entire city evacuated.

“This year, we wanted Christmas to mean just a little bit more for the residents of Fort McMurray,” said Richard Bartrem, WestJet vice-president of marketing communications.

“WestJet is deeply connected to the community, which is why we wanted to show them how much we care. We were at the airport the day the fire hit town, and several WestJetters also lost their homes. This year’s Christmas miracle was an opportunity for WestJet to do what we do best – help connect a community, celebrate the season and bring a smile to peoples’ faces.”

WestJet hosted almost 1,000 local residents at a Snowflake Soiree at the end of November for a night they would never forget.

The party was full of surprises for families, including a variety of crafting activities, a performance by Canadian music superstar Johnny Reid and the of course the biggest surprise of all – special white boxes that floated down from the sky.

Each gift box contained personalized family portraits in a Christmas ornament and – WestJet flight vouchers for the entire family.

“I think it’s important for myself, all the people here, for the rest of the world, to show Fort McMurray that we care,” said Reid. “And that even in our darkest times, there are people out there that are going to show up and show them light, love and support.”

Among the Snowflake Soiree guests were seven families who received special gifts from WestJetters who heard the families’ stories and wanted to help by giving their own irreplaceable items.

These included an heirloom watch from the Second World War, a special snowboard and a childhood book with an encouraging message. View the families’ stories here.

“We know this will be a difficult Christmas for the community,” said Bartrem. “It’s important for us to show the people of Fort McMurray they are not forgotten.”

If you need a good cry today, Christmas Miracle: Fort McMurray Strong may be just for you.

 

Just Posted

Transitioning back into the world

Courtenay man had been living outdoors before starting Sally Ann program

A cuddle and a coffee: Six Island towns named among Canada’s most cozy

Sidney, Campbell River, Courtenay, Parksville, Tofino and Ucluelet crack Expedia’s top 40

Comox Valley Santa’s Workshop in need of bicycles for youngsters, gifts for teens

Santa’s Workshop, at 464 Puntledge Road (formerly the Red Cross building), is… Continue reading

New Coast Guard radar boosts marine traffic monitoring off B.C. coast

Six radar installations set up for Georgia Strait to Queen Charlotte Strait to Prince Rupert

Liquor store robbery suspect arrested

The Comox Valley RCMP have identified the suspect in relation to the… Continue reading

The fair with 1,000 stories

Tibetan carpets, Ugandan bags and scarves from the Peruvian Andes were among… Continue reading

BC Minister of Agriculture loses stepson to accidental overdose

Lana Popham announces death of her 23-year-old stepson, Dan Sealey

Mid Island Farmers Institute discusses fleece at November meeting

Are you a lover of wool and local fibre? Interested in raising… Continue reading

Comox Valley Nature invites the public to learn about nature photography

Comox Valley Nature is hosting a public lecture on photography. Join Terry… Continue reading

The fair with 1,000 stories

Tibetan carpets, Ugandan bags and scarves from the Peruvian Andes were among… Continue reading

Canadian military’s template for perfect recruits outdated: Vance

Gen. Jonathan Vance, the chief of defence staff says that the military has to change because the very nature of warfare is changing, particularly when it comes to cyber-warfare

‘Toxic’ chosen as the Word of the Year by Oxford Dictionaries

Other top contenders for 2018 include ‘gaslighting’ and ‘techlash’

RCMP bust illegal B.C. cannabis lab

Marijuana may be legal but altering it using chemicals violates the Cannabis Act

Canada defeats Germany 29-10 in repechage, moves step closer to Rugby World Cup

Hong Kong needs a bonus-point win over Canada — scoring four or more tries — while denying the Canadians a bonus point

Most Read