Acadia on the Walk takes another step forward

94-unit apartment complex proposed at Cliffe Avenue

  • Oct. 29, 2014 6:00 a.m.

Scott Stanfield

Record Staff

A 94-unit apartment complex proposed at Cliffe Avenue and Anfield Road took a further step forward last week, when Courtenay council approved a development permit with a parking variance for 117 stalls.

“It’s definitely a step in the right direction,” said Brett Giese, owner of Crowne Pacific Development. “At this point it’s all but a done deal, and we’re starting to think of construction timelines, but also staying cautious the way things have gone.”

The complex is dubbed Acadia on the Walk. The plan is to divide the project into a pair of 47-unit buildings beside the Courtenay River Estuary, offering a gateway to the city’s trail network. The suites would be a mix of two and three bedrooms renting for $900 to $1,100 per month.

Despite some “surprises along the way,” Giese said the main issues hampering progress are mostly out of the way.

“The intersection was a frustrating one,” he said, referring to a proposed turn lane from Sandpiper Drive onto Cliffe. “We were able to come up with a mutually accepted design.”

At Monday’s meeting, city CAO David Allen said staff have made headway in recent months.

“We think we’ve come up with a livable design,” Allen said. “There’s still some work to be done.”

Coun. Ronna-Rae Leonard lauded the affordability of the units and the project’s proximity to amenities.

“We are desperately in need of affordable, rental stock,” she said.

Giese credits the city for putting up a small amount of money, and for enabling the company to allocate DCC funding (Development Cost Charges) to fix the intersection.

“That was a big moving point,” he said.

The company will be required to pay $1,147,270 million in DCC charges, and $47,000 to a Parks, Recreation, Cultural and Seniors Facilities Amenity Reserve Fund.

In addition, Crowne Pacific will construct a three-metre wide walkway that will add a link from the riverway to Millard Creek Park on the west side of Cliffe.

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

 

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