NEWS BULLETIN file photo

B.C. Ferries issues travel bans to aggressive, abusive passengers

Motorist ‘aggressively drove toward’ a ferry worker in one incident this month

B.C. Ferries has had to issue one-year travel bans to certain passengers this month.

The ferry corporation noted in a press release today, Oct. 31, that it has issued “multiple” travel bans in the past two weeks, adding that it has a “zero tolerance policy” for abuse of employees.

B.C. Ferries mentioned three incidents specifically, the most recent of which occurred Oct. 22 when a passenger allegedly assaulted an employee on the Coastal Celebration on the Tsawwassen-Swartz Bay route.

RELATED: Man arrested after BC Ferries worker sexually assaulted aboard vessel

According to the press release, a passenger threatened use of a firearm to an employee at the Horseshoe Bay terminal in West Vancouver on Oct. 17. Two days earlier, at the Langdale terminal in Gibsons, a passenger “aggressively drove his motor vehicle toward an employee.”

The B.C. Ferries press release notes its staff have the right to a workplace that is respectful and free from harassment and violence. By law, the ferry corporation is allowed to refuse passage on its vessels.

“We are committed to providing our employees and passengers a safe and respectful environment,” said Mark Collins, B.C. Ferries president and CEO, in the release. “The vast majority of our passengers treat our employees courteously. Abusive conduct or comments, or behaviours that put our employees or the public at risk, are not tolerated. These behaviours result in a denial of service, travel ban and the involvement of police agencies.”

RELATED: B.C. Ferries to roll out anti-abuse notices at terminals as workers’ union speaks out

RELATED: Passengers denied ferry ride after breaking rules



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Valley mother encourages food literacy and mindfulness with placemats

The Mindful Meals placemats help kids to slow down and pay attention to the food they eat.

Victim of downtown Courtenay assault dies from injuries

RCMP confirm file is now a homicide investigation

North Island College’s annual 3-Hour Fiction Contest returns

Two competitions; one for adults, one for U-18 writers

Comox Valley’s drinking water within lead guidelines, say staff

Residents with old homes may still want testing if concerned about pipes, solder

Denman ferry cable to be replaced with plastic cable – for now

The first flattened steel strand cable is expected to be installed late summer 2020

VIDEO: ‘Climate emergency’ is Oxford’s 2019 Word of the Year

Other words on the shortlist included ‘extinction,’ ‘climate denial’ and ‘eco-anxiety’

Comox Fire Rescue donates defibrillator to St. George’s United Church

Comox fighters have donated an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to St. George’s… Continue reading

Study finds microplastics in all remote Arctic beluga whales tested

Lead author Rhiannon Moore says she wasn’t expecting to see so many microplastics so far north

Services needed in B.C. for early-onset Alzheimer’s disease patients: doctor, advocates

More patients are being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at an earlier age

Canucks erupt with 5 power-play goals in win over Nashville

Vancouver ends three-game slide with 6-3 triumph over Predators

Nanaimo man caught with more than 200,000 child porn images to be sentenced

Crown says Aaron Macrae recorded video of children on buses and at his workplace

Vancouver Island hunters may have harvested deer in area known for chronic wasting disease

Conservation officers make urgent request to public for any information

65-million-year-old triceratops fossil arrives in Victoria

Dino Lab Inc. is excavating the fossilized remains of a Triceratops prosus

B.C. widow suing health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed her husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Most Read