FILE – Security camera images recorded in Saskatchewan of Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, are displayed as RCMP Sgt. Janelle Shoihet speaks during a news conference in Surrey, B.C., on Tuesday July 23, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canadian Armed Forces spent $123,000 on Manitoba manhunt for B.C. fugitives

Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19, confessed to killing three people, RCMP said

The manhunt for two fugitives wanted for three murders in northern B.C. cost the Canadian military just under $123,000.

In an email to Black Press Media Thursday, the Canadian Armed Forces said it provided air support in the search for Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, and Kam McLeod, 19, in northern Manitoba.

The RCMP had requested the military’s help on July 26, 11 days after the first killing. Mounties said the two Port Alberni fugitives left a video where they confessed to killing University of B.C. lecturer Leonard Dyck on July 15, and two tourists, American Chynna Deese and her Australian boyfriend Lucas Fowler, on July 19. They fled to a remote part of northern Manitoba near Gillam and their bodies were found on Aug. 7.

VIDEO: Missing Alberni teens now suspects in three northern B.C. killings

The military sent two planes to assist in the manhunt. These were aCC-130H Hercules aircraft and its crew, which included two pilots, an air combat systems officer, a flight engineer, a loadmaster and two search and rescue technicians; as well as a CP-140 Aurora aircraft and its crew, which included two pilots, one flight engineer, two air combat systems officers and five airborne electronic sensor operators.

READ MORE: RCMP getting air support from military in hunt for McLeod, Schmegelsky

The military aid was called off by the RCMP on July 31. The $123,000 in costs included additional costs for personnel and equipment that were accrued directly as a result of the manhunt, but do not include regular salaries or cost of equipment that the military already had.

Earlier this year, the B.C. RCMP said they spent around $750,000 on the investigation, while Manitoba Mounties spent under $800,000.

READ MORE: B.C. RCMP spent roughly $750K on massive manhunt for Schmegelsky, McLeod

READ MORE: Bodies of B.C. fugitives believed to have been found in Manitoba


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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