City draws contingency plan for families affected by teachers’ strike

Scott Stanfield

Record Staff

The City will provide additional children’s programs to assist parents and families in case the teacher work stoppage continues next month.

Staff have developed a contingency plan — the Parent Saver Program — to provide activities for children six to 12 years, Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Activities include arts, dance, gymnastics, adventure programs and music.

Weekly program revenue would be $3,750, based on 30 children each at $125 per week. A per day enrolment rate of $40 will also be available.

Expenses would be $1,700 per week — based on two staff members, supplies and volunteers — and $300 in advertising.

 

•Council directed staff to seek public input through newspaper advertising about a proposed brewery lounge endorsement, which will come before council Sept. 8.

The Gladstone Brewing Company is planning to open a micro-brewery at 244 Fourth St. in the downtown core. If endorsed, patrons will be allowed to drink beer in a lounge area on the manufacturing site.

Input from the Downtown Courtenay Business Improvement Association will also be sought.

The company says the DCBIA, future neighbours, the fire department and the Chief Building Inspector support the brewery and lounge proposal.

Mayor Larry Jangula, noting the number of empty buildings, said the proposal “could be a positive thing for downtown” in terms of increased foot traffic.

 

•Council approved amendments to a dated noise bylaw that needed clarity and revision.

Staff deal with about 10 noise-related complaints each month. Those who don’t comply with verbal and written requests can face a $500 fine. Police also deal with noise complaints outside of regular business hours.

According to a staff report, residents generally feel the city addresses noise concerns in an effective and timely manner.

The city does not have sufficient resources to enforce a bylaw containing sound level measurements.

Coun. Jon Ambler, noting the subjective nature of attempting to legislate noise, feels it is too costly to attempt to measure sound, referring to the idea of consulting with a sound engineer.

 

 

 

•Council approved second reading of a rezoning to allow a secondary suite at a residence at 425 Back Rd. The only concerns expressed thus far are to do with parking. A public hearing will be held Sept. 2 at 5 p.m. in council chambers.

Council adopted a park dedication bylaw to transfer a parcel of land containing Garry Oaks at Vanier Secondary to the city.

Council also approved a zoning amendment for a single family development at Crown Isle Boulevard and Ryan Road. The applicant — Silver Sand Corp. — plans to construct 31 lots. The subdivision will include a trail connecting to the college and new hospital.

 

 

 

•Tom Sparrow, chief project officer of the North Island Hospitals Project, presented Jangula with a symbolic shovel, used at a recent groundbreaking ceremony at the future hospital site next to North Island College.

After 2 1/2 years of signing documents, Island Health and Tandem Health Partners reached financial close on the project June 30.

Excavation and foundation work has begun on the state-of-the-art regional hospital. Service is scheduled to commence April 30, 2017.

A new hospital is also being constructed in Campbell River.

Coun. Ronna-Rae Leonard noted concerns expressed by chemotherapy patients about losing a waiting room and bathroom at the new facility. Sparrow recognizes that hospitals have cut back on bathrooms but was surprised about the possible loss of a waiting room.

The next community information meeting about the hospital is slated for Sept. 16 from 7-9 p.m. at the Stan Hagen Theatre at the college. In Campbell River, a meeting will be held Sept. 18 from 7-9 p.m. at Timberline Secondary.

For more information about the project visit nihp.viha.ca/

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

 

Just Posted

Unity Comox Valley hosts serenity service in Comox Thursday

Do you have mixed feelings about the holidays? Unity offers a special… Continue reading

UPDATE: RCMP involved in crash south of Courtenay Saturday night

An RCMP member was involved in a three-vehicle collision on Highway 19… Continue reading

Mental health advocate’s journey with dissociative identity disorder sparks conversation

Coast Mental Health Courage to Come Back Awards nomination deadline Jan. 31

Assisted living workers allegedly attacked while picketing

BCGEU president Stephanie Smith says arrows and gasoline were thrown at the picketers early in the week

Dangerous drug confirmed in the Comox Valley

Lab test confirms the presence of fentanyl in powder substance

VIDEO: This B.C. school leads country in vaccine donations to UNICEF

Federally funded Kids Boost Immunity uses quizzes to earn vaccinations

Boeser scores 3, Pettersson has 5 points as Canucks hammer Blues

Vancouver picks up impressive 6-1 win in St. Louis

B.C. police stop drunk driver who offered up burger instead of ID

Roadblock checks over the weekend found at least two other impaired drivers

In Canada, the term ‘nationalism’ doesn’t seem to have a bad rap. Here’s why

Data suggest that Canadians don’t see the concept of nationalism the way people do in the United States

Small quake recorded west of Vancouver Island

No injuries or tsunami warning after 5.4 rumble felt some 400 kilometres from Victoria

B.C. suspends Chinese portion of Asian forestry trade mission due to Huawei arrest

Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou was detained at the request of U.S. in Vancouver

Canadians spent $1.7 billion dollars online in December 2017

Online retail sales accounted for 3.4 per cent of total retail sales

2-year investigations nets $900,000 in refunds for payday loan customers

Consumer Protection BC says selling practices were ‘aggressive and deceptive’

China: Canada’s detention of Huawei exec ‘vile in nature’

Huawei is the biggest global supplier of network gear for phone and internet company

Most Read