City draws contingency plan for families affected by teachers’ strike

Scott Stanfield

Record Staff

The City will provide additional children’s programs to assist parents and families in case the teacher work stoppage continues next month.

Staff have developed a contingency plan — the Parent Saver Program — to provide activities for children six to 12 years, Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Activities include arts, dance, gymnastics, adventure programs and music.

Weekly program revenue would be $3,750, based on 30 children each at $125 per week. A per day enrolment rate of $40 will also be available.

Expenses would be $1,700 per week — based on two staff members, supplies and volunteers — and $300 in advertising.

 

•Council directed staff to seek public input through newspaper advertising about a proposed brewery lounge endorsement, which will come before council Sept. 8.

The Gladstone Brewing Company is planning to open a micro-brewery at 244 Fourth St. in the downtown core. If endorsed, patrons will be allowed to drink beer in a lounge area on the manufacturing site.

Input from the Downtown Courtenay Business Improvement Association will also be sought.

The company says the DCBIA, future neighbours, the fire department and the Chief Building Inspector support the brewery and lounge proposal.

Mayor Larry Jangula, noting the number of empty buildings, said the proposal “could be a positive thing for downtown” in terms of increased foot traffic.

 

•Council approved amendments to a dated noise bylaw that needed clarity and revision.

Staff deal with about 10 noise-related complaints each month. Those who don’t comply with verbal and written requests can face a $500 fine. Police also deal with noise complaints outside of regular business hours.

According to a staff report, residents generally feel the city addresses noise concerns in an effective and timely manner.

The city does not have sufficient resources to enforce a bylaw containing sound level measurements.

Coun. Jon Ambler, noting the subjective nature of attempting to legislate noise, feels it is too costly to attempt to measure sound, referring to the idea of consulting with a sound engineer.

 

 

 

•Council approved second reading of a rezoning to allow a secondary suite at a residence at 425 Back Rd. The only concerns expressed thus far are to do with parking. A public hearing will be held Sept. 2 at 5 p.m. in council chambers.

Council adopted a park dedication bylaw to transfer a parcel of land containing Garry Oaks at Vanier Secondary to the city.

Council also approved a zoning amendment for a single family development at Crown Isle Boulevard and Ryan Road. The applicant — Silver Sand Corp. — plans to construct 31 lots. The subdivision will include a trail connecting to the college and new hospital.

 

 

 

•Tom Sparrow, chief project officer of the North Island Hospitals Project, presented Jangula with a symbolic shovel, used at a recent groundbreaking ceremony at the future hospital site next to North Island College.

After 2 1/2 years of signing documents, Island Health and Tandem Health Partners reached financial close on the project June 30.

Excavation and foundation work has begun on the state-of-the-art regional hospital. Service is scheduled to commence April 30, 2017.

A new hospital is also being constructed in Campbell River.

Coun. Ronna-Rae Leonard noted concerns expressed by chemotherapy patients about losing a waiting room and bathroom at the new facility. Sparrow recognizes that hospitals have cut back on bathrooms but was surprised about the possible loss of a waiting room.

The next community information meeting about the hospital is slated for Sept. 16 from 7-9 p.m. at the Stan Hagen Theatre at the college. In Campbell River, a meeting will be held Sept. 18 from 7-9 p.m. at Timberline Secondary.

For more information about the project visit nihp.viha.ca/

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

 

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