Cougar kills house cat on Vancouver Island

“You should not have your cats outside anywhere, but certainly not in Ucluelet or Tofino.”

The B.C. Conservation Service was called to Ucluelet this week after a cougar killed a domestic house cat.

Acting Sergeant for Central Vancouver Island, Stuart Bates, told the Westerly News they received a report on Wednesday night around 11:30 p.m. near the local Co-op gas station.

He said the COS has no plans to trap or remove the animal because cougars are naturally active at night, but will monitor the animal’s behaviour.

“At this point it was night-active and skiddaddled out of the area. It didn’t hang out, just grabbed the cat and left. If a cougar is being day-active, then we’re going to have an issue,” Bates said.

“(Being active at) 11:30 in the morning versus 11:30 at night is a big difference. Until I get more sightings and find out that this cougar is habituated, like we’ve had before in Ucluelet where they’ve become day-active and they’re hanging out, then we deal with it.”

He hopes the incident serves as a reminder to West Coast residents to never leaves their pets unattended outside.

“You should not have your cats outside anywhere, but certainly not in Ucluelet or Tofino,” he said, adding there are a variety of predators in the area like wolves, cougars, eagles, racoons and owls.

“They resemble the small prey out there and they will get taken. Hopefully, with this call, everybody puts their house cats away and the cougar learns ‘Oh, there’s no food here’ and it will leave.”

He urges anyone who spots a predator, like a cougar or bear, to immediately report their sighting to the Conservation Officer Service at 1-877-952-7277.

“People always give us a bad rap they think we’re just going to go shoot it. The more information I have the better decision I can make. I can’t stress that enough,” he said.

“As long as wildlife is, as we say, playing by the rules. We don’t come out and remove them. We try to make sure that we control the situation that can make them get worse…The quickest way to get a bear killed is don’t call me, because you’re going to allow it to get habituated and conditioned and then you’re finally going to call me when it starts breaking into structures, at which point I have no choice. If you call me early I can intercede.”

Just Posted

2019 Federal election: Courtenay-Alberni candidates address seniors issues

“What are your party’s plans to ease the stress realized by seniors on fixed incomes?”

2019 FEDERAL ELECTION: North Island-Powell River candidates discuss marine traffic and ocean protection

In an effort to inform the North Island-Powell River riding constituents, we… Continue reading

Penalties put Comox Valley Glacier Kings on defensive

Team is carrying three goalies to start the VIJHL season

Large turnout for Cumberland climate strike

Approximately 200 people showed up at the Village office in Cumberland to… Continue reading

Second environmental march coming to Courtenay Sept. 27

March organized by the Youth Environment Action team

VIDEO: A moment to remember during the World Lacrosse Men’s Indoor Championship in B.C.

Diego Hernandez Valenzuela’s team lost, but he felt like a winner Saturday

B.C. Lions hype-man marks 15 years of cheers

Crazy P cheers, chants, bangs his drum and spreads a message of love

Island music trivia tournament a hit on World Alzheimer’s Day

More than $13,000 raised by people naming that tune

PHOTOS: Steller sea lion with plastic around neck rescued on Vancouver Island

Rescue staff determined the plastic band cut the protected animal’s neck approximately two inches

B.C. VIEWS: School officials join fact-free ‘climate strike’

Students, public get distorted picture of greenhouse gases

Handgun crackdown, health spending and transit plans latest campaign promises

Friday was the end of a busy week on the campaign trail

B.C. woman photographs massive ant swarm on Abbotsford driveway

She asked what the ants were doing? The answer: war

Iconic 90s TV show ‘Friends’ celebrates 25th anniversary

The iconic, decade-long television show aired its first episode 25 years ago today

Most Read