A fuel spill from a private commercial property in Courtenay has caused diesel fuel to enter the city’s storm drain system and could be seen in the water at the Courtenay Airpark. Photo by Erin Haluschak

A fuel spill from a private commercial property in Courtenay has caused diesel fuel to enter the city’s storm drain system and could be seen in the water at the Courtenay Airpark. Photo by Erin Haluschak

Courtenay fuel spill results in diesel entering storm drain system

Anywhere between 100 and 200L of diesel spilled but most was collected, says ministry

A fuel spill from a private commercial property in Courtenay has caused diesel fuel to enter the city’s storm drain system.

A sheen could be seen in the water at the Courtenay Airpark following the spill which happened around 10:20 a.m. March 6.

A government spokesperson for Environment and Climate Change Strategy – the provincial agency responsible for completing any investigation into the spill and any required remediation – told the Comox Valley Record BC Transit reported the spill during refueling at the Esso Cardlock at 2650 Cliffe Ave. after a vehicle accidentally pulled away from the pump during a fill-up.

The spokesperson added anywhere between 100 and 200L of diesel spilled but was collected in three drains on-site, and BC Transit, Esso and the City of Courtenay responded immediately, and fuel was isolated and pumped out.

“Almost all was recovered. When the bus left the lot, a small amount of fuel may have trailed from the bus and into a city storm drain and made its way into the estuary. The responsible party undertook mitigative steps and is proceeding with clean up.”

The spokesperson noted the ministry continues to monitor the situation and added it would be premature to speculate on repercussions against the responsible party.

Anne Guillo, manager of communications with the city confirmed the city deployed containment booms in the estuary to help prevent the fuel from spreading and contacted the B.C. Ministry of Environment to confirm they were aware.

Booms were still in place Tuesday to contain the spill.

Within the province, reporting spills and environmental emergencies fall under the BC Environmental Management Act.



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