Cumberland opts out of South Sewer Project

Project team assessing implications of Village's decision

  • Nov. 16, 2015 1:00 p.m.

Scott Stanfield

Record staff

Cumberland council has opted out of the multi-million dollar South Sewer Project, but the regional district nevertheless plans to forge ahead with its proposed community wastewater system for Royston and Union Bay. The aim is to address the impact of failing septic systems.

The project team is assessing the implications of Cumberland’s decision.

“Cost is a key focus and we’ve heard clearly from Area A residents that this will be critical to their continued support,” said Kris La Rose, manager of liquid waste planning. “(But) We remain committed to the project and moving forward with our First Nations partners to find a solution for the residents. We will continue to build on the extensive work and engagement already undertaken to move this project forward in a timely manner that can meet grant timelines.”

At its Nov. 9 meeting, council directed staff to restart the Liquid Waste Management Planning (LWMP) process and to re-examine sewage treatment options. The Village’s sewage treatment has issues with elevated levels of phosphorous and excessive wet weather flows, and is out of compliance with regulatory standards.

Council has said it does not support the treated effluent disposal location at Georgia Strait off Cape Lazo, which would yield a project cost of about $56 million. Cumberland would prefer discharging to Baynes Sound at an estimated cost of $49.5 million.

Federal grants will cover $17 million of the cost. Funds need to be spent by September, 2018. La Rose said staff will develop a revised project scope that reflects the reduced inflow resulting from Cumberland’s decision.

“This revised scope will consider changes to cost estimates while keeping as close as possible to the plans created to date — which are the basis of the UBCM Strategic Priorities grant and the selection of a preferred outfall location by the south region LWMP.”

For more info, email southsewer@comoxvalleyrd.ca, call 250-871-6100 or drop by the project office at 3843 Livingstone Rd. on Thursdays from 1-4 p.m. Visit comoxvalleyrd.ca/southregionlwmp for updates, including details about an upcoming open house.

 

Just Posted

Last Simms Park concert of the season to double as a food bank fundraiser

Bring a donation for the food bank to the My Generation concert, Sunday, Aug. 25

City of Courtenay adds pickleball courts Martin Park lacrosse box

Lacrosse, pickleball, and recreational ball hockey players in the Comox Valley can… Continue reading

Stage 3 water restrictions in the Comox Valley beginning September 3

Restrictions in effect until Sept. 27 for BC Hydro scheduled maintenance

Fanny Bay Challenge asks visitors to support businesses during highway closure

Community rallies as part of Highway 19A closes for six weeks due to culvert project

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

Cross-examination begins for B.C. dad accused of killing young daughters

Andrew Berry is charged in the deaths of six-year-old Chloe and four-year-old Aubrey in 2017

Community organizes drop-in cricket game

Alan Dafoe and a few other caring members of the community arranged… Continue reading

Dog attacked by river otters, Penticton owner says

Marie Fletcher says her dog was pulled underwater by four river otters in the Penticton Channel

Opinions vary about single-use plastics

Local governments in the Comox Valley are enacting bylaws to regulate single-use… Continue reading

BC SPCA overwhelmed with cats, kittens needing homes

Large number of cruelty investigations, plus normal ‘kitten season’ to blame

Most Read