Feedback about Cumberland school merger mostly positive

The public feedback about merging Cumberland's two schools into one campus will pick up when students are back from spring break.

The public feedback part of the project to merge Cumberland’s two schools into one campus will pick up when students are back from spring break.

Cumberland Elementary School co-principal Katy Doran says the process until now has mostly been informational, including a community information night in late-February outlining the draft educational vision to parents. But, school administration will focus on the community consultation phase of the project next month.

Doran adds so far parents and staff have been supportive of the junior and elementary schools merging into one kindergarten-to-Grade 9 campus.

“Most of (the feedback is) really, really positive,” says Doran. “A couple people are concerned about maybe the behaviours of the older kids with the younger kids, and that’s a legitimate concern of some parents. But the vast majority, teachers included, and parents, believe that the behaviours of the (older) kids will actually improve when little ones are around.”

Students will be grouped into multi-year cohorts, but Doran says the campus will truly be shared by all grades, giving more opportunity for cross-grade learning.

“We’re looking at more cross-grade relationships certainly, between the students,” she says, noting one example could be to bring the kindergarten class into the home economics classroom to learn cooking skills alongside older students. Another similar idea would be to bring younger children into the shop classes to learn with older students.

“We wouldn’t let little guys use power tools but they could work with big buddies using some hand tools, maybe the Grade 4s with the Grade 9s or something like that,” she continues, noting these ideas are an extension of the Grade 9 leadership buddy program already in existence.

Meanwhile, learning on the campus will continue to move in the direction of individualized learning or personalized learning, with a focus on skills like critical thinking, collaboration and communication.

“We’re looking at getting inquiry at all levels, so play-based learning for Grades K to 3, project-based for Grades 4 to 7 and then inquiry-based learning for Grades 8 and 9,” she says.

As well, Doran says administration is looking at moving the pre-school over to the campus, too, and strengthening working relationships with groups like the Cumberland Recreation Institute and Cumberland Community Schools Society.

For more information about the draft educational vision, visit http://cumberlandschool.ca.

writer@comoxvalleyrecord.com

 

Just Posted

Canadian Forces member charged with possessing magic mushrooms in Comox

Master Cpl. Joshua Alexander, with the 407 Maritime Patrol Squadron, facing two drug-related charges

Valley mother encourages food literacy and mindfulness with placemats

The Mindful Meals placemats help kids to slow down and pay attention to the food they eat.

Victim of downtown Courtenay assault dies from injuries

RCMP confirm file is now a homicide investigation

North Island College’s annual 3-Hour Fiction Contest returns

Two competitions; one for adults, one for U-18 writers

Comox Valley’s drinking water within lead guidelines, say staff

Residents with old homes may still want testing if concerned about pipes, solder

Fashion Fridays: Holiday outfits on a budget

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

EDITORIAL: Ad lacked attention to detail

If you don’t know by now about the unfortunate typo in an… Continue reading

Eagles congregate around Salish Sea for one last feast before period of famine

Mountainaire Avian Rescue Society preparing to receive birds in need of care

Comox Fire Rescue donates defibrillator to St. George’s United Church

Comox fighters have donated an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to St. George’s… Continue reading

Smudging in B.C. classroom did not affect Christian family’s faith, says school district lawyer

Lawyers make closing arguments in a Port Alberni case about the Indigenous cultural practice

Most B.C. residents, including those hit by 2018 storms, not prepared for outages: report

Create an emergency kit, BC Hydro says, and report all outages or downed lines

Study finds microplastics in all remote Arctic beluga whales tested

Lead author Rhiannon Moore says she wasn’t expecting to see so many microplastics so far north

Services needed in B.C. for early-onset Alzheimer’s disease patients: doctor, advocates

More patients are being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at an earlier age

Nanaimo man caught with more than 200,000 child porn images to be sentenced

Crown says Aaron Macrae recorded video of children on buses and at his workplace

Most Read