Garbage-recycling proposal rejected, but CVRD chair glad for democracy

Comox Valley Regional District chair Edwin Grieve thanks the 4,289 residents who voted in Saturday's referendum.

Comox Valley Regional District chair Edwin Grieve thanks the 4,289 residents who voted in Saturday’s referendum that defeated a proposal for a solid waste pickup service in rural areas.

“It goes to show that you can have all the public meetings, written comments and telephone surveys but you really have go to the people,” Grieve said. “We are so fortunate to live in a country where we have democratic process.”

Unofficial results indicate 73 per cent of voters said no to the service that would have reached about 7,500 homes in areas A, B and C. The turnout was 29 per cent.”

The CVRD considered rural pickup when it appeared the public supported the proposed program. Some residents, however, were angry about not being able to opt out of the service.

Phil Harrison voted No because he doesn’t need the service. The Area B resident composts and recycles monthly at Home Depot or the landfill in Cumberland.

“I’m not in favour of having a free enterprise service administered by local government,” Harrison said. “It’s not a complex critical service, as is managing and delivering tap water, and I don’t see the need for a third-party cost.”

Pickup would have cost about $150 per household per year. The CVRD board had awarded a three-year service contract to BFI Canada.

Harrison said there was a prevailing feeling that the CVRD was not forthright on the cost, the BFI bid and the bylaw.

Sun Coast Waste was low bidder by almost $275,000.

Harrison also said a number of rural residents are still upset about imposed water rates and inequities.

He suggests the referendum, with just 27 per cent support, sends a strong message of a “disconnect” between rural residents and the CVRD, which predicted 75-per-cent support for universal roadside rural service.

Along with reducing costs for most residents and diverting recyclables from landfills, Grieve said another benefit of roadside collection is a rebate program offered by Multi-Material British Columbia (MMBC), which manages the collection and processing of packaging and printed paper (PPP) materials. To apply and receive rebates, local governments need to ‘own’ the service.

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

 

Just Posted

Comox Valley Ground Search & Rescue kept busy across the province

CVGSAR had a busy week, sending rescuers as far away as Invermere

‘Beauty amongst such tragedy:’ B.C. photographer captures nature’s trifecta

David Luggi’s photo from a beach in Fraser Lake shows Shovel Lake wildfire, Big Dipper and an aurora

Glacier View residents take a ride on the river

Ground Search and Rescue guides floaters on Puntledge

Brewing up some community engagement

Insp. Tim Walton says goodbye to the Comox Valley

Canadians fear for relatives trapped amid flooding in Indian state of Kerala

More than 800,000people have been displaced by floods and landslides

IndyCar driver Wickens flown to hospital after scary crash

IndyCar said Wickens was awake and alert as he was taken to a hospital

Ex-BCTF president ‘undeterred’ after early release from pipeline protest jail term

Susan Lambert and Order of Canada recipient Jean Swanson released early

Fast food chains look to capitalize on vegetarian, vegan trend with new items

Seven per cent of Canadians consider themselves vegetarians and 2.3 per cent identify as vegans

B.C. swimmer halts journey across Strait of Juan de Fuca after hypothermia sets in

Victoria MS athlete Susan Simmons swam for eight-and-a-half hours in 9 C choppy waters

‘Hard on water:’ Smoke not the only long-range effect of wildfires

The project began more than 10 years ago after southern Alberta’s 2003 Lost Creek fire

B.C. VIEWS: Genuine aboriginal rights are misused and discredited

Camp Cloud one of long line of protests falsely asserting title

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to march in Montreal’s Pride parade

Trudeau will end the day in his home riding of Papineau

Most Read