Greens calling for positivity, co-operation

Green Party candidate Sue Moen is challenging the candidates in the other parties to create a better atmosphere for the 2011 federal election by letting Canadians know that their candidates are capable of being positive, as well as negative.

Green Party candidate Sue Moen is challenging the candidates in the other parties to create a better atmosphere for the 2011 federal election by letting Canadians know that their candidates are capable of being positive, as well as negative.

For the rest of this first week, each day the Green Party will propose an issue or idea where we think all parties can find common ground, Moen says in a news release.

“For the fourth time in seven years, Canada finds itself in a federal election. I know that Canadians feel this is an unnecessary use of taxpayers’ money and they are sick of the mud-slinging and the personal attacks.

“We are saying; let’s try to engage the voters. Let’s try to show them that, once in a while, we can agree on important policy issues,” said Green leader Elizabeth May.

The first big proposal from the Greens is that Canada needs a nationwide employment and education initiative for youth.

There was a rally Monday organized by students at Vancouver Island University in solidarity with their teachers. North Island College students have also been affected by the action in Nanaimo.

Youth understand what is needed for them to have a bright and prosperous future, and they are actively seeking balance and justice for themselves and their communities, Moen says.

“I am asking the other candidates in Vancouver Island North to join in and find common ground. Show voters they are able to co-operate and work together with other parties, and agree Canada needs an investment in a nationwide employment and education initiative for youth,” says Moen.

— Green Party of Canada