Journey continuing for ‘fitness fanatic’

It's not the destination but the journey
When fitness competitor Kaylee Norton of Royston set out on the "road to competition," it was never about arriving at the destination, but the journey to get there. "Figure competition is about evolution, constantly aiming to improve yourself for the next one," said Norton.

Royston Figure Competitor Kaylee Norton is enjoying the evolution of her body and improving her physique.

Royston Figure Competitor Kaylee Norton is enjoying the evolution of her body and improving her physique.

It’s not the destination but the journey

When fitness competitor Kaylee Norton of Royston set out on the “road to competition,” it was never about arriving at the destination, but the journey to get there. “Figure competition is about evolution, constantly aiming to improve yourself for the next one,” said Norton.

March 26 was the beginning of a new road for this fitness fanatic.

The FAME West competition was filled with beautiful people — both inside and out.

“I met so many wonderful people,” said Norton. “Everyone from the stage managers, to the volunteers, to the judges and the competitors were all friendly and helpful. I was backstage by myself, but there was always someone there to chat with and help me out.”

How did Norton do?

“There were so many fabulous physiques, I would hate to be a judge,” she exclaimed.

Norton placed sixth in figure and eighth in fitness model.

“I’m happy with my placings,” she said. “I didn’t step on stage to win; I competed to give myself a definable goal and challenge myself. Plus, I had an opportunity to talk to a couple of judges, and I know where I need to work to improve my physique for next competition.”

Norton is now aiming for the FAME Pacific Rim Competition on Aug. 6 — eight months sooner than expected.

When the organization heard about Norton’s employment uncertainty, they offered to pay her registration fees.

“Competing can be expensive,” she noted. “From posing suits to the aesthetic extras and even the travel and accommodations for the event — now that my employment is over, I wasn’t expecting to compete before next year. When they offered to pay my fees, I couldn’t help but cry.”

And how has the transition to normal life been for Norton?

“This time, coming out from competition was difficult,” she said. “I ended up getting a cold right before that weekend, so I had to take it easy after. I like to get back to the gym soon after to prevent too much of a rebound — that’s hard on the body. Not only that, but my husband ended up with a collapsed lung, and two weeks after the competition, he found himself down in Victoria having surgery. It’s been a stressful time, but now, about a month out, things are settling down.”

While figure competition is often perceived as an individual sport, competitors always have support from outside sources — whether trainers, nutritionists or posing coaches. Norton did most of her prep herself but did have many people supporting her.

“I had friends raise some money to help with the financial side, and I even had a friend fly in from Toronto to cheer me on in the crowd,” she said. “I also had weekly massages with Dean at Summit Therapeutic and Sports Massage Clinic — I can’t imagine how much more I would have been hurting from my workouts if I didn’t have him taking care of me. And I couldn’t have done it without my husband.”

Norton looks forward to continuing to sculpt her body in preparation for August.

To follow her progress and see the services she offers as a personal trainer, visit her website at www.outerstrength-innerpeace.com.

— Outer Strength, Inner Peace