RCMP. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)

RCMP. (Phil McLachlan - Black Press Media)

Kelowna Mountie hit with 2nd lawsuit in 2 months for alleged assault

Const. Julius Prommer is accused of breaking a woman’s knee during while responding to a noise complaint

A Kelowna Mountie is facing a second lawsuit alleging his excessive use of force resulted in broken bones.

Judith Reid filed a civil claim on Monday, Oct. 26 alleging Const. Julius Prommer broke her knee while responding to a noise complaint in February 2018. The incident was previously investigated by B.C.’s police watchdog, the Independent Investigations Office (IIO), during which Prommer denied the claims.

The suit follows a similar one against the same officer over an incident last month. Dustin Blondin alleged that Prommer broke his hand during a traffic stop in September 2020. The injury later required surgery.

Following local media reports of that incident, Reid stated she realized she had a “legitimate claim” against Prommer over her incident with the officer dating back more than two years.

Reid claims she was in her room in Kelowna on the evening of Feb. 28, 2018, doing exercises. Allegedly, this upset the upstairs neighbour who called the police.

When the officer, alleged to be Prommer, arrived at the door, Reid opened it. She says she told the officer to wait a moment and went to grab her phone from her bed. She then informed Prommer that if he wanted to have a conversation with her, she would be recording it.

“Without any indication or provocation, Prommer entered the plaintiff’s room and forcibly kicked the back of the plaintiff’s leg,” the suit claims.

“As a result of Prommer’s assault on the plaintiff, the plaintiff fell to the floor of her bedroom in excruciating pain.”

The claim states, Prommer then handcuffed Reid and attempted to drag her back up on her feet.

“(Prommer) proceeded to berate the plaintiff to stand up on her leg, which was obviously damaged by Prommer’s assault on the plaintiff,” reads the claim.

Given the pain Reid was in, Prommer then called for an ambulance, which transported both of them to Kelowna General Hospital.

The suit claims after waiting for a while without being attended to in the emergency department, Reid agreed to go to the RCMP detachment to be processed.

During transport to the detachment, Reid claims Prommer intentionally moved his seat back, squeezing her already injured leg, putting her in further discomfort. She says she was placed in the “drunk tank” upon arrival at the station, despite having no alcohol in her system.

An ambulance transported Reid back to the hospital following her release from RCMP custody. X-rays showed she suffered a tibial plateau fracture, which required surgery.

The suit claims Reid was never informed of the reason for her arrest and she was never charged in relation to the incident.

Reid claims she still suffers nightmares, sleepless nights, depression and anxiety due to Prommer’s actions.

The IIO report, delivered in February 2019, found Prommer did not use excessive force but noted that, despite knowing of Reid’s injuries, RCMP failed to report the incident when it happened. The IIO did not become aware of the incident until almost four weeks later when Reid reported it herself.

The claims have not yet been tested in court, and neither Prommer nor the RCMP has responded to the civil claims.

READ MORE: Kelowna man injured during arrest sues RCMP

READ MORE: Kelowna Mountie at centre of UBCO wellness check investigation faces third lawsuit

Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email: michael.rodriguez@kelownacapnews.com


@michaelrdrguez
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

assaultRCMPRCMP harassment lawsuit

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The opening day on Mount Washington this year was Dec. 4. Screenshot
Mount Washington opens on time, COVID-19 protocols in place

“We’re super excited - it’s been six months in the planning.”

After holding recent meetings socially distanced but in person at Isfeld Secondary, the board of education was back meeting via Zoom because of recent pandemic restrictions. Image, screenshot
Most parents approve of schools’ handling of pandemic, says Comox Valley superintendent

Schools forced to adapt to COVID-19, including finding alternative to regular theatre production

The Gnarly Craft Fair is going virtual this year. Photo by Kim Stallknecht
Gnarly Youth Craft goes virtual

The virtual fair will be open until Dec. 19 and features talented youth aged 9 -19 years

Lake Trail Middle School in Courtenay has closed again due to a threat Friday (Dec 4). File photo
Lake Trail Middle School closed for the second time in a week due to threat

On Nov. 26, the school was closed for a day while a similar incident occurred.

Comox Valley singer-songwriter Helen Austin, and Cincinnati’s Paul Otten are Big Little Lions. Photo via biglittlelions.com
Big Little Lions earn Canadian Folk Music Award nomination

Duo featuring Comox Valley singer-songwriter Helen Austin keeping busy during pandemic

Pickleball game in Vancouver on Sunday, November 8, 2020. B.C.’s public health restrictions for COVID-19 have been extended to adult team sports, indoors and outside. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
711 more COVID-19 cases detected in B.C. Friday

‘Virus is not letting up and neither can we’

Beefs and Bouquets
Comox Valley Beefs & Bouquets for week of Dec. 2

Beef to deer hunters; bouquet from a store owner to shoppers

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Demonstrators, organized by the Public Fishery Alliance, outside the downtown Vancouver offices of Fisheries and Oceans Canada July 6 demand the marking of all hatchery chinook to allow for a sustainable public fishery while wild stocks recover. (Public Fishery Alliance Facebook photo)
Angry B.C. anglers see petition tabled in House of Commons

Salmon fishers demand better access to the healthy stocks in the public fishery

(Hotel Zed/Flytographer)
B.C. hotel grants couple 18 years of free stays after making baby on Valentines Day

Hotel Zed has announced a Kelowna couple has received free Valentines Day stays for next 18 years

Farmers raise slogans during a protest on a highway at the Delhi-Haryana state border, India, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rejected the diplomatic scolding Canada’s envoy to India received on Friday for his recent comments in support of protesting Indian farmers. Tens of thousands of farmers have descended upon the borders of New Delhi to protest new farming laws that they say will open them to corporate exploitation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Manish Swarup
Trudeau brushes off India’s criticism for standing with farmers in anti-Modi protests

The High Commission of India in Ottawa had no comment when contacted Friday

Nurse Kath Olmstead prepares a shot as the world’s biggest study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway Monday, July 27, 2020, in Binghamton, N.Y. U.S. biotech firm Moderna says its vaccine is showing signs of producing lasting immunity to COVID-19, and that it will have as many as many as 125 million doses available by the end of March. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Hans Pennink
Canada orders more COVID vaccines, refines advice on first doses as cases reach 400K

Canada recorded its 300,000th case of COVID-19 on Nov. 16

Apartments are seen lit up in downtown Vancouver as people are encouraged to stay home during the global COVID-19 pandemic on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. British Columbia’s deputy provincial health officer says provincewide data show the most important area B.C. must tackle in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic is health inequity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
Age, income among top factors affecting well-being during pandemic, B.C. survey shows

Among respondents earning $20,000 a year or less, more than 41 per cent reported concern about food insecurity

Victoria-based driving instructors are concerned for their own and the community’s safety with the continued number of residents from COVID hotspots in the Lower Mainland coming to the city to take their driving road tests. (Black Press Media file photo)
Students from COVID hotspots travel to Vancouver Island for driving tests

Union leader calls on government to institute stronger travel ban

Most Read