NDP environmental critic speaking Saturday in Courtenay

A proposed coal mine in the Comox Valley will be addressed Saturday by NDP environment critic Rob Fleming.

NDP ENVIRONMENT CRITIC Rob Fleming will speak Saturday in Courtenay.

The controversial proposal for a massive underground coal mine in Comox Valley will be one of the topics addressed by NDP environment critic Rob Fleming when he speaks at the Comox Valley NDP’s annual fall dinner this Saturday.

“Christy Clark and the Liberals have made it clear they want to weaken public input and the environmental assessment process for these kinds of projects,” said Fleming. “It’s never been more important for people to fight to have their voices heard.”

Fleming said people from Comox Valley have told him they are very concerned about Clark’s recent comments that she is “tired” of hearing people say they have concerns about mines and that government should be “getting out of the way of economic activity.”

“The Liberal attitude is to ram projects through regardless of the consequences,” said Fleming. “We want to see sustainable mining in B.C., and the best way to achieve that is to have thorough environmental assessments and community participation in the process.”

Fleming said instead of weakening environmental standards, the Liberals should listen to local voices who are calling for a more rigorous environmental assessment.

“There is a better way of doing things,” said Fleming. “We can listen to the public, listen to the experts and make decisions that are in the best interests of the community.

“Comox Valley has a healthy, strong  and sustainable shellfish industry that employs hundreds of people. Our first economic priority should be making sure that it is not put at risk.”

In addition to addressing the coal mine, Fleming will talk about NDP proposals for generating long-term sustainable jobs.

Local NDP candidate Kassandra Dycke will introduce Fleming at the fall dinner.

“I am really looking forward to hearing about positive alternatives to the economic and environmental challenges we face,” she said.

Saturday’s dinner is at the Florence Filberg Centre Conference Hall at 411 Anderton St. in Courtenay. Doors open at 5 p.m., and the dinner starts at 6 p.m. It will feature wild salmon, roast beef and pasta with local chaterelle mushrooms.

Tickets are $50 and can be purchased at Laughing Oyster Bookshop in Courtenay or Blue Herron Books in Comox. Call Jeanette Reinhardt at 250-335-3262 to reserve tickets at the door.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

North Island College announces 2020 graduation award winners

North Island College has announced the award recipients for the 2020 Graduation… Continue reading

Couple opts for plan B for wedding in Courtenay

Pandemic restrictions prompt April Powell and Hayden Eely to change plans for the big day

‘Someone knows something’: a look into Vancouver Island missing persons with interactive map

There are more than three dozen people listed as missing throughout Vancouver Island

Provincial COVID-19 data can now be used for B.C. to prepare for a second wave

In the past week, B.C. has seen a slight spike in daily test-positive case counts

Union Bay water plant now finished

Work allows health authority to lift boil water advisory

Wage subsidy will be extended until December amid post-COVID reopening: Trudeau

Trudeau said the extension will ‘give greater certainty and support to businesses’

Trudeau apologizes for not recusing himself from WE decision

He says his and his family’s longtime involvement with the WE organization should have kept him out of the discussions

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Washington’s NFL team drops ‘Redskins’ name after 87 years

The franchise was given the name back in 1933, when it was still in Boston

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

B.C. Ferries increasing passenger capacity after COVID-19 restrictions

Transport Canada 50-per-cent limit being phased out, no current plans to provide masks

Most Read