New legislation proposed by the federal government will ban large oil tankers from stopping or unloading in Haida Gwaii or northern B.C. waters. (File photo/Black Press)

New legislation proposed by the federal government will ban large oil tankers from stopping or unloading in Haida Gwaii or northern B.C. waters. (File photo/Black Press)

Oil tanker ban to be reviewed by committee

Indigenous groups for and against Bill C-48 travel to Ottawa to influence the Senate’s decision

Senators in Ottawa have voted to send the oil tanker ban to a committee for further examination.

The proposed law would ban tankers carrying more than 12,500 metric tonnes of crude or persistent oil as cargo from stopping or unloading at any point beween the northern tip of Vancouver Island to the Alaska border.

On Dec. 11, the Senate passed the second reading of Bill C-48, and it will now be sent to the Transport and Communications committee.

The delay in passing the bill is what Haida Hereditary Chief Gidansda (Guujaaw) is concerned about. “That’s the plan, to delay it until another government will come in and do away with it all together.” He travelled with a delegation of First Nations chiefs and political leaders to Ottawa in the first week of December to urge the Senate to pass the oil tanker ban.

“It’s clear they were getting a story that all the First Nations had changed their mind and don’t want a moratorium. There’s pretty heavy lobbying going on right now by oil,” he said.

READ MORE: Minister Garneau details tanker ban policy

Nunavut senator, Dennis Glen Patterson, spoke against the bill after meeting with several First Nations leaders in the past two weeks. He shared what he heard from the Nisga’a when they met and why they disagree with the bill.

“The Nisga’a will never support a project which will jeopardize our good,” he said. “The government has proceeded without any accommodation with the Nisga’a. The modern treaty opened the door to the development of our natural resources, they told us, yet Bill C-48 was introduced without any meaningful dialogue and despite pleas that Bill C-48 should not cover the Nisga’a treaty area.”

Patterson also mentioned the president of Eagle Spirit Energy Holdings Ltd., Lax Kw’alaams member, Calvin Helin, who was in Ottawa on Dec. 11 to speak out against the bill. The tanker ban would prevent his $16-billion pipeline project from moving forward.

Helin wants the ban to be struck down, or that an amendment is allowed for a transit corridor in Dixon Entrance. Eagle Spirit Pipeline plans to carry crude oil from Fort McMurray to a terminal in Grassy Point, near Prince Rupert. If the moratorium goes through, Plan B would be to set up a terminal in Hyder, Alaska.

The Senate heard comments from the opposition to the bill stating that the Eagle Spirit Pipeline is an opportunity to defeat poverty on reserves. With the decline in the fishing and forestry industry, they need work and a new industry to support their communities.

“There’s very few and far opportunties in northern B.C. and this is one of the biggest opportunities for a lot of First Nations to get out of poverty,” said Chief Dan George of Burns Lake Band.

Although the Eagle Spirit pipeline is not within their territory, the Burns Lake Band has been offered a small percentage of the benefits for supporting the project.

Calvin’s brother, John Helin, the mayor of Lax Kw’alaams, is currently involved in a civil claim in the Supreme Court of B.C. against the Attorney General of Canada claiming the tanker ban bill is infringing on their rights to control their traditional land. The civil claim is suspended until the bill has been passed through the Senate.

READ MORE: GoFundMe launched to fight oil-tanker moratorium

Consultation has been conducted with Indigenous people, industry and communities across Canada since Jan. 2016 when Minister of Transport Marc Garneau first travelled to Prince Rupert.

Garneau was mandated to formalize a moratorium on crude-oil tankers when he became a cabinet minister. His spokesperson, Delphine Denis, said the federal government has held approximately 75 engagement sessions with Indigenous groups, industry stakeholders and communities across Canada since Jan. 2016.

Last week, the minister met with the Coastal First Nations group in Ottawa.

“They expressed support for C-48, including hereditary chiefs of the Allied Tribes of Lax Kw’alaams, and the Chiefs and political Leaders of the Haida Nation, Metlakatla First Nation, Gitga’at First Nation, Gitxaala First Nation, the Heiltsuk Nation, Kitasoo-Xai’Xais, the Nuxalk Nation and Wuikinuxv Nation,” said Denis.

“C-48 formalizes an existing policy which has been in place for over 30 years now prohibiting oil tankers off the northern coast of B.C.”

The proposed oil tanker moratorium bill has been referred to the Standing Committee on Transport and Communications for consideration. The bill will then move to the report stage, and a third reading before being passed through the Senate.

The next federal election is Oct. 21, 2019.



shannon.lough@thenorthernview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

oil tanker ban

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Union Bay voters chose a new direction Saturday. Photo by Mike Chouinard
Union Bay voters opt for governance change

More than seventy per cent support dissolving UBID to roll services into regional district

A small crash in the water south of Courtenay Saturday afternoon. Two men had to be rescued, but reports indicate there were no serious injuries. Photo by Mike Chouinard
Small plane crash south of Courtenay Saturday afternoon

Two rescued from plane that had flipped in water; no serious injuries reported

Rogan is a three-year-old border collie who has an 'incredible bond' between him and a family member. Photo by Erin Haluschak
‘Incredible bond’ credited for dog who assisted in emergency

Three-year-old dog Rogan came to the rescue of a family member who fell

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement forecasting windy weather Sunday and Monday. (News Bulletin file photo)
More windy weather on the way for Vancouver Island

Environment Canada issues special weather statement for Victoria, east coast of Island, north Island

A map of Comox Valley schools. Screenshot, Fraser Institute
Comox Valley schools near mid-pack in Fraser Institute rankings

A few schools went up or down a few points, but most came in with similar marks

Mary Cox and Jack Plant dance in their pyjamas and slippers at the morning pyjama dance during the Rhythm Reelers’ 25 Annual Rally in the Valley Square Dance Festival in Chilliwack on June 4, 2011. Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020 is Square Dancing Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Nov. 29 to Dec. 5

Square Dancing Day, Disability Day and International Ninja Day are all coming up this week

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Help make children’s wishes come true

Black Press Media, BraveFace host mask fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Kevin Bieksa during his days playing with the Vancouver Canucks. (Photo: commons.wikimedia.org)
Bieksa to guest on free Canucks Alumni ‘Hot Stove’ on Zoom app

Former NHL player has become a game analyst on Sportsnet

A photo from 2017, of Nuchatlaht First Nation members outside court after filing a land title case in B.C. ( Submitted photo/Nuchatlaht First Nation).
Vancouver Island First Nation calls on B.C. to honour UNDRIP in historic title case

Nuchatlaht First Nation says Crown counsel continues to stall the case using the ‘distasteful’ argument that the Nation ‘abandoned’ their land

West Vancouver Island’s Ehattesaht First Nation continues lock down after 9 active cases were reported today after a visitor tested positive last week. (Ehattesaht First Nation/Facebook)
Ehattesaht First Nation’s COVID-19 nightmare: nine active cases, a storm and a power outage

The Vancouver Island First Nation in a lockdown since the first case was reported last week

The Blackberry Lane Children’s Centre outgrown its space in the back of the Denman Island Community Hall. Photo supplied
Denman Island to have new preschool with metal roof

Thanks to a local government grant and community support, the Denman Island… Continue reading

114 Canadians were appointed Nov. 27 to the Order of Canada. (Governor General of Canada photo)
Indigenous actor, author, elder, leaders appointed to Order of Canada

Outstanding achievement, community dedication and service recognized

The Ahousaht First Nation confirmed its first case of COVID-19 on Nov. 26, 2020. (Westerly file photo)
Ahousaht First Nation on lockdown over COVID-19

“Emotions are high. The anxiety is high. We want our community to pull through.”

Most Read