Retired Northern Health official: Managers should have to eat the same food served in hospitals

Former chief medical health officer says hospitals are relying too much on “corporate food”

David Bowering’s breakfast offering when he was a patient at Mills Memorial Hospital last year. (David Bowering photo)

A retired senior Northern Health Authority official is convinced hospital food would be different if top managers ate the same food that’s served in their facilities.

“Rather than health system executives feeding themselves the best catered food available at their meetings while they talk about ‘quality patient-centred care,’ it should be a legal requirement that all of their snacks and catered lunches come directly from the local hospital exactly as it is fed to patients,” wrote former chief medical health officer David Bowering in a social media post.

He says reliance on what he termed “corporate food” continues to increase and that healthy, fresh food is increasingly “becoming a distant memory.”

“The better the hospital food gets, the better their own publicly-funded free lunches will taste. It’s called feedback,” Bowering says of what health executives could be eating.

Adding to his comments in a subsequent interview, Bowering says Northern Health, like other large organizations, is increasingly relying on large food-providing corporations because of cost.

READ MORE: Doctor recruiting drive showing results

“What we’re seeing is more and more decisions being made by people who are more distant now from the consequences,” he said.

“They are also increasingly risk-averse,” he says of large organizations such as Northern Health preferring mass-produced processed-food.

Locally-sourced food through local growers and suppliers throughout the region, however, would add to food freshness, quality and healthier options, Bowering adds.

He does acknowledge the challenges of providing food through the wide variety of Northern Health’s facilities located across a large swath of the province.

However, he says it’s not impossible – on Haida Gwaii, Northern Health patients are offered fresh-caught fish.

“What’s needed is a long-term vision,” says Bowering of an effort to marry local food with that provided by large corporations.

In response, Northern Health’s Eryn Collins says that when the authority’s executives do meet in its various facilities, their food is catered directly from the kitchens at those facilities.

“So they are eating what’s on the menu,” she says.

READ MORE: Drinking water concerns at northern B.C. hospital

Collins describes health care facility food services as complex and challenging in that patient meals can depend upon individual dietary requirements tied to their individual medical conditions.

“At Mills Memorial Hospital [in Terrace], for instance, meals are prepared from scratch in their kitchens,” says Collins.

“There are a variety of items prepared for each meal,” she says in adding Northern Health does use food that’s been frozen.

And while Northern Health does strive to meet a provincially-mandated target that 30 per cent of the food prepared is sourced locally, Collins says the definition of ‘local’ can be interpreted as food from within B.C.

“We do have challenges due to the size of the region,” she notes.

Still, most recent reports indicate Northern Health’s food is now 19 per cent local, up from a previous level of 16 per cent.

“We continue to look at ways to improve within the challenges and constraints we have,” says Collins.

READ MORE: Radiology improvements boost regional patient care

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Pick up a pie from On The Fly

Comox Valley Airport cafe using time away to seek our new offerings

Courtenay-Alberni MP encouraged by Ghost Gear Fund

It may not be a large chunk of change in the scheme… Continue reading

RBC Dominion Securities doubling YANA Ride dollars

RBC Dominion Securities and their investment advisors Brendan Somers, Lara Austin, Don… Continue reading

Tailgate Troubadours perform for Comox Valley shut-ins during pandemic

When playing music with others is your main entertainment and diversion, and… Continue reading

Tofino woman’s plan for medical school nearly derailed by health crisis

Tofino resident/North Island College alumna Nora Morrison is heading to the University… Continue reading

21 new COVID-19 cases confirmed in B.C. as virus ‘silently circulates’ in broader community

Health officials urge British Columbians to enjoy summer safely as surge continues

Tough time for tree fruits as some B.C. farm products soar

Province reports record 2019 sales, largely due to cannabis

‘Let’s all do a self-check’: Okanagan mayor reacts to racist vandalism targeting local family

Home of Indo-Canadian family in Summerland was targeted on evening of July 13

Province agrees to multimillion-dollar payout for alleged victims of Kelowna social worker

Robert Riley Saunders is accused of misappropriating funds of children — often Indigenous — in his care

Feds fund safe drug supply pilot program for Cowichan

The opioid overdose crisis continues to be one of the most serious public health crises

B.C. businessman David Sidoo gets 3 months behind bars for college admissions scam

Sidoo was sentenced for hiring someone take the SATs in place of his two sons

PHOTOS: Inside a newly-listed $22M mega-mansion on ALR land in B.C.

The large home, located on ALR land, is one of the last new mansions to legally be built on ALR land

Thousands of dollars in stolen rice found in B.C. warehouse

Police raid seizes $75,000 in ‘commercial scale’ theft case

COVID-19 gives B.C. First Nation rare chance to examine tourism’s impact on grizzly bears

With 40 infrared cameras deployed in Kitasoo-Xai’Xais territory, research will help develop tourism plan with least impact on bears

Most Read