Sewage commission approves $1M to repair aging sewer pipe

Funds will be used to make immediate repairs to protective covers previously placed over the pipe

  • Nov. 2, 2016 6:00 a.m.

The Comox Valley Regional District’s sewage commission has approved $1 million in funding to protect Goose Spit and Baynes Sound from environmental risks created by an aging sewer pipe.

At the most recent commission meeting, members were presented with a risk analysis (to view, go to  bit.ly/2eljgq8) of the large diameter sewer pipe currently installed within the beach below Willemar Bluffs (Balmoral Beach). The analysis identified serious potential risks due to beach erosion caused by exposure to wave action, and made recommendations aimed at protecting the pipe until the Comox No. 2 pump station is constructed and this section of forcemain is decommissioned.

“Given the high level of risk, it is imperative that we take immediate action to protect the environment,” said Barbara Price, chair of the sewage commission. “The long-term solution of a new pump station, that will allow us to decommission this section of pipe, is several years away. We must be proactive to protect our estuary, ocean, beaches and Baynes Sound shellfish industry. There is too much at risk to delay.”

The funds will be used to complete a highly specialized pipe condition assessment and to make immediate repairs to protective covers previously placed over the pipe. A request for proposal (RFP) will be issued and it is anticipated the contract will be awarded in January 2017 with the assessment completed by June 2017. Proponents will be asked to provide pricing for condition assessment of two sections of pipe: from the Courtenay Pump Station to Beech Road and from Beech Road to the Treatment Plant. A cost/benefit, risk analysis will be completed before finalizing the full scope of the assessment. Funding for the pipe condition assessment will be from the Comox Valley sewerage reserve fund.

Even with the protective cover repair work, the risk of a failure exists. In the event of a spill, minimizing response time will be crucial to mitigating impacts. A detailed emergency spill response plan is being developed that includes mobilization of necessary labour, equipment and materials, identification of permits or approvals that can be obtained in advance, and development of a training program for staff. This plan will be completed in fall 2016.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

North Island College launches virtual orientation

New and returning North Island College students are being welcomed to the… Continue reading

Comox Valley artist expands horizons through North Island College’s DIGITAL Design department

Submitted by NIC North Island College alumna Marlee Pestell is breaking into… Continue reading

85-year-old Comox sprinter competes in worldwide virtual track meet

Toronto was slated to be the host city for the 2020 World… Continue reading

B.C. records 146 new COVID-19 cases through long weekend

More that 28 people tested positive for the virus each day since Friday

Canucks tame Minnesota Wild 4-3 to even NHL qualifying series

J.T. Miller leads Vancouver with goal and an assist

COVID-19 vaccine efforts provide hope but no silver bullet to stop pandemic: Tam

There are more than two dozen vaccines for COVID-19 in clinical trials around the world

Two people die in propane heated outdoor shower near Princeton

Couple was attending a long weekend gathering

Study shines light on what makes LGBTQ+ youth feel safe in a community

The study goes beyond looking at school or family supports

Alberta to require masks at schools this fall, but still no mandate in B.C.

B.C. students are also set to return to classrooms in September

B.C. to allow customers to buy cannabis online for in-store pickup at private shops

Age verification will still be required inside the store

30% of British Columbians would ‘wait and see’ before taking COVID vaccine: poll

Some are concerned about side effects, while others don’t think the virus is a big deal

What exactly is ‘old growth’ B.C. forest, and how much is protected?

Forests minister Doug Donaldson doesn’t support ‘moratorium’

Most Read