The Bank of Canada is seen Wednesday September 6, 2017 in Ottawa. A Bank of Canada deputy governor says the effects of U.S. trade unknowns, lower oil prices and weaker housing and consumer spending are behind the recent deceleration in the country’s economic growth. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)

Trade issues, oil slump and lower spending have slowed growth: BoC deputy

Timothy Lane says this slowdown in Canada’s economic expansion is temporary

A Bank of Canada deputy governor says the effects of U.S. trade unknowns, lower oil prices and weaker housing and consumer spending are behind the recent deceleration in economic growth.

In prepared remarks of a speech today in Washington, Timothy Lane says this slowdown in Canada’s economic expansion is temporary.

Lane says these factors along with the fiscal stimulus that has energized the American economy and, as a result, led the U.S. Federal Reserve to raise interest rates have been putting downward pressure on the Canadian dollar.

He says the lower loonie will help support the Canadian economy through this period.

Lane says uncertainty related to U.S. policies has kept business investment lower than where it should be at this point, given the overall strength in the Canadian economy.

Last month, Bank of Canada governor Stephen Poloz kept his benchmark interest rate unchanged at 1.75 per cent as the economy navigates what he described as a temporary period of softness created by a recent, sharp decline in world oil prices.

Lane’s speech to the Peterson Institute for International Economics focused on explaining how Canada manages its foreign reserves, which he noted are about US$85 billion or five per cent of the country’s gross domestic product.

He describes the size of Canada’s foreign reserves as modest yet adequate because the country has a freely floating exchange rate.

One relatively recent development, Lane noted, is that other central banks and monetary authorities started adding Canadian-dollar assets to their reserve portfolios following the global financial crisis about a decade ago. Reserves in Canadian dollars are now about $200 billion, he said.

READ MORE: Bank of Canada offers explanations for country’s ‘puzzling’ wage disappointment

READ MORE: Bank of Canada holds interest rate, views oil slump as temporary soft patch

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Comox Valley Cycling Coalition AGM upcoming

The Comox Valley Cycling Coalition will have a couple of special guest… Continue reading

Risk of ‘deadly avalanches’ leads to warning for B.C.’s south coast

Weak layer of snow on Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland could trigger an avalanche

Update: Early morning shooting in Courtenay

Reporter at taped-off scene outside apartment complex

NIC hosts high school students

North Island College hosted a High School Open House Thursday at the… Continue reading

B.C. man in wheelchair following police shooting

“Shots were fired by police and the Kelowna man was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.”

Peter Tork, Monkees’ lovable bass-guitar player, dies at 77

Tork, Micky Dolenz, David Jones and Michael Nesmith formed the made-for-television rock band

From a drunk judge to Clifford Olson: George Garrett recounts a life in B.C. news radio

New book from ‘Intrepid Reporter’ George Garrett offers readers a glimpse behind the headlines

Wife remembers B.C. man killed in possible case of mistaken identity

Rex Gill was in Kamloops working to support his family after oilfield job dried up

Comox Valley Community Foundation introduces new online donation portal

The Comox Valley Community Foundation (CVCF) is pleased to announce our new… Continue reading

One dead, two seriously injured in Hwy 4 crash west of Port Alberni

A man has died following a single-vehicle collision west of Port Alberni… Continue reading

Millennial men least likely to have a family doctor: Statistics Canada

Report found more women have primary care physicians, compared with men

70% of Canadians agree with mandatory vaccines for children: poll

The debate for pro and anti vaccinations has heated up after a measles outbreak in Vancouver

Most Read