Trudeau exonerates hanged war chiefs of 1864 on B.C. Tsilhqot’in title lands

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and TNG Chief Joe Alphonse ride to the meeting place Friday at Xeni Gwet’in where Trudeau exonerated six hanged war chiefs of 1864 before Tsilhqot’in members. Angie Mindus photos

About two hundred Tsilhqot’ins gathered in the Nemiah Valley Friday to witness Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau personally apology and exonerate six of the Nation’s war chiefs who were hanged in 1864.

It was a picturesque scene at about 1 p.m. when Trudeau and Chief Joe Alphonse, TNG chairman, galloped into the grassy area flanked by snow-capped mountains to start the historic meeting.

Following speeches by the current Tsilhqot’in chiefs, Trudeau took to the microphone, stating he recognized that the war chiefs were only protecting their nation which was under threat by another at the time when they were lured to a meeting in Quesnel by colonial officials for peace talks and were instead arrested, tried and hanged.

“Those were mistakes that our government profoundly regrets and is determined to set right,” Trudeau said.

“The treatment of the Tsilhqot’in chiefs represents a betrayal of trust, an injustice that you have carried for more than 150 years.”

The chiefs that perished on Oct. 26, 1864 near Quesnel were Head War Chief Lhats’as?in (Lhas-awss-een); Chief Biyil (pe-yal); Chief Tellot (tay-lot); Chief Tahpitt (ta-peet); Chief Chayses (chay-sus); and Chief Ahan (a-han) who was hanged in New Westminister in 1865.

Those who took part in the day Friday said they felt happy about the exoneration from Canada, but also sad that their war chiefs had to give their lives to protect their lands. He said they hoped now they rest in peace.

Chief Joe Alphonse said the meeting on traditional lands was an enjoyable, relaxing experience for him compared to going to Ottawa in March to the House of Commons where Trudeau first formally exonerated the war chiefs.

Read More: Prime Minister Trudeau formally exonerates Tsilhqot’in war chiefs

He said he was very pleased that the Prime Minister accepted the invitation to come to the title lands so that the TNG members could hear for themselves the exoneration.

Xeni Gwet’in Chief Jimmy Lulua thanked Trudeau for coming to title lands and said he was proud of his Tsilhqot’in people.

“I’m so excited to keep moving forward and it’s an honour and I thank Justin Trudeau for being the first prime minister to come to title lands and to set history right.”

Chief Russell Myers Ross said he hoped the apology would allow for meaningful government-to-government work moving forward.

After the formal apology and exoneration, the Nation presented Trudeau with a special gift — a replica of the buckskin jacket given to his father which was made at that time by Tsilhqot’in member Julie Gilpin. Julie was on hand to present the new jacket, made by her daughter Denise Gilpin, to Trudeau.

“It fits perfect,” Trudeau said, smiling and noting all his dad’s jackets were small for him.

Trudeau then made his way into the crowd to greet as many people as he could before making the long journey back to Williams Lake by vehicle, the same way he came in, and flying out of the airport there.

Payel Laceese, a grandson to Julie and son to Denise, said he hoped the meeting would bring healing.

“Our people can let that go without there being that grudge,” he said, adding he felt there was a special connection with Trudeau, due to the history with the jacket.

“It’s not just a nation-to-nation relationship, it’s family-to-family.”

Former Xeni Gwet’in chief Annie Williams also thought the meeting was exceptional.

“It’s hard to believe he was here,” she said as the convoy pulled away. “It felt like he was one of us.”


Do you have a comment about this story? email:
editor@wltribune.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Comox Archives and Museum makes presentation to d’Esterre Seniors’ Centre

At its June board meeting, Comox Archives and Museum board presented an… Continue reading

Annual Denman Island pancake breakfast coming up

Local fundraiser supports many initiatives

VIDEO: Miners Memorial graveside ceremony

For 34 years, the Cumberland Museum and Archives has presented Miners Memorial,… Continue reading

Having a day in the park

A temporary transmitting station is set up in Filberg Park in Comox… Continue reading

Filling the gap rescuing relocated cats

Grassroots organization CATS seeking volunteers to assist

Air Canada reviewing how crew left sleeping passenger on parked plane

In a Facebook post, the woman said she woke up ‘all alone’ on a ‘cold dark’ aircraft

Two bear cubs saved near Revelstoke after mother hit by car

Conservation officers trapped the cubs and transported them to a wildlife sanctuary

Heroism medal for B.C. woman who tried to save wheelchair-bound man stuck on rail tracks

Julie Callaghan awarded Carnegie Medal from U.S.-based foundation for ‘extraordinary heroism’

Surrey RCMP raises Pride flag amid din of protesters

There were about 30 protesters on either side, and 20 Mounties doing crowd control

B.C. students’ camping trip goes ahead despite tents getting stolen

Nanaimo businesses, school staff and parents ensure trip goes on

Only legal pot shop between Vancouver and Kamloops now open

Private cannabis store on Skwah land in Chilliwack is first B.C. licensee to be Indigenous owned

Green Party candidate talks upcoming federal election during visit to the North Island

Mark de Bruijn sat down with the North Island Gazette for an interview on Sunday in Port Hardy.

Victoria woman in L.A. hospital after she was run over twice

Lynn Phillips has suffered from multiple broken bones and internal bleeding

‘Text neck’ causing bone spurs to grow from millennials’ skulls, researchers say

Technology use from early childhood causing abnormal bone growths in 41 per cent of young adults

Most Read