Are government regulations forcing out small meat producers?

Dear editor,

I recently received my annual order of chickens from a local organic farmer.

Dear editor,

I recently received my annual order of chickens from a local organic farmer.

She was quite upset when she had to break the news that I will no longer be getting the chicken neck that was usually sent along with the rest of the bird.

Now, many of you may not find that a great concern, and in terms of food, the neck is usually used only for making stock. The concern it brings up is our right to eat what we want.

The farmer takes her chickens to a fully up-to-date slaughterhouse down Island whose owner is being slowly forced to shut down because of new regulations being imposed on her by government. Soon, she may no longer be able to operate and may have to close up shop.

This would mean that local poultry producers who use her services will be forced to take their birds to another, probably bigger slaughterhouse, probably further away. This will drive the cost of raising these animals higher so that the farmer may no longer be able to produce meat birds.

All because the government is implementing regulations that make no sense even though they say they “are there to protect the consumer.”

We are slowly being forced to buy food from the big meat producers who can afford access to the big abattoirs.

Now if you pay attention to the news, you will know that tainted food is not coming from your local farmer but from the big producers.

Some will argue that locally grown food is not always affordable to a lot of folks, and I can agree, having to feed a family of five. However, one doesn’t have to eat meat every day or indulge in the huge servings that so many do. The money saved can then go to the purchase of “good” meat.

Look at the piles of meat that are offered up by so many grocery stores, fast food joints, and restaurants. If we decrease the demand and shop locally, perhaps we can affect a change, bringing about more freedom to choose — a freedom which, in many aspects of our lives, and not only for carnivores, is slowly being taken away.

I suggest watching The Scarecrow by Chipotle on YouTube (actually a game), to encourage you to think about what you eat.

Sabine Schill,

Cumberland

 

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