Coal mining does not affect aquaculture

Dear editor,

I decided to look into the claims/innuendo of Coal Watch Comox Valley and am of the opinion that they owe an apology to the citizens of the Valley in general and to Compliance Energy in particular.

Also, as the donations they received were based on incorrect, inaccurate and misleading information, they should have the integrity to refund those donations in full.

Anyone viewing their misrepresentations as fraud could file a complaint under Section 380 of the Criminal Code of Canada.

There are four maladies that affect shellfish, they are amnesic (ASP), diarrheal (DSP), neurotoxic (NSP) and paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), none of which is caused by mining of any description. Therefore any change in water quality is more likely to be caused by the run-off from the slurry used in agriculture or septic tanks, etc.

Coal Watch points to the Union Bay coal hills as a reason why mining should not be allowed.

Yet, in reality, this area is a monument to the fact that coal mining does not affect aquaculture.

This area has been exposed to the elements for decades yet shellfish production in B.C. has risen from 5,550 tonnes in 1987 to 8,450 tonnes in 2013. That is an increase of 52.2 per cent.

The Comox Valley produces at least 50 per cent of the total production. This is in spite of the Union Bay area being tagged as the 13th most contaminated site in B.C.

The Discover Comox Valley website states:

In the late 1800s and the early 1900s coal was the mainstay of central Vancouver Island’s economy. Built on rich coal seams, the inland settlement of Cumberland became a flourishing community. After World War I, the demand for coal lessened and Cumberland has subsequently become a community rich in mining heritage.

The economy of the Valley can once again look forward to increased prosperity because of mining.

Ian Kimm

Duncan

 

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