Comox Valley deal-makers — get your heads out of the sand

Dear editor,

I moved to the Comox Valley in 1970, and over the next 10 years, kept hearing about the "second crossing," which 12 or 13 years later became the 17th Street Bridge.

In 1986 I returned and for the past eight to 10 years, I have listened to the rumblings of a third crossing — wherever and whenever?

Dear editor,

I moved to the Comox Valley in 1970, and over the next 10 years, kept hearing about the “second crossing,” which 12 or 13 years later became the 17th Street Bridge.

In 1986 I returned and for the past eight to 10 years, I have listened to the rumblings of a third crossing — wherever and whenever?

The latest controversy is the location for the new hospital and if in fact it could or should be one large facility for the North Central Island or two smaller ones (one each for the Comox Valley and another for Campbell River).

I don’t think it takes a member of Mensa to deduce that a larger, better-equipped facility within a 30- to 40-minute drive would better serve the vast majority of people between both communities.

No. The NIMBY and LIMBY groups (not in my back yard/locate in my back yard) are too busy arguing to agree on anything.

Then if that’s not enough, an area the size of what should be the parking lot is being considered in a location already having traffic problems.

My solution — a few years ago we (the regional district) were offered a 40-acre parcel of land free to build a new hospital near the new Inland Island Highway. Enough room to expand, have a large parking lot, chopper pad, and accessible to all within a reasonable driving time and distance.

There were a few strings attached but it sounded quite doable.

The present option of moving the chosen site a few hundred yards up the road by North Island College to a smaller lot makes even less sense than the first selection.

Stop thinking two years down the road and try thinking 20 to 30 years down the road.

The deal-makers in the Comox Valley and Campbell River should get their heads out of the sand and think of the future patients instead of their own selfish egos.

There is a job to do. Get on with it. Put your brains in gear, your mouths in neutral and your egos in park!

Chances are the second coming will happen before any of these latest projects. My apologies to the church-goers in the community.

Brian Lavigne,

Comox

Just Posted

Comox Valley firefighters assist with wildfire effort

Four Courtenay firefighters are in Fort St. James helping with the fight… Continue reading

Woman rescued from Stotan Falls calling for safety measures

3L Developments did not comment on immediate plans to add safety precautions

B.C. declares state of emergency as more than 560 wildfires rage

This is only the fourth state of emergency ever issued during a fire season

More than 22,000 blood donors needed

Canadian Blood Services is urging Canadians to help meet patients’ needs this… Continue reading

Kiyoshi Kosky running for Courtenay City Council

I am Kiyoshi Kosky and am running in the upcoming Courtenay Municipal… Continue reading

Interim GoFundMe payments approved in Humboldt Broncos crash

$50,000 to be given to each of the 13 survivors and each family of the 16 people who died

Altidore nets 3 as Toronto drubs Whitecaps 5-2

Vancouver falls 7-4 on aggregate in Canadian Championship final

Ottawa intervenes to get B.C. ball player, 13, to Little League World Series

Before immigration issue was resolved, Dio Gama was out practicing the game he loves Wednesday

Pet goldfish invades small B.C. lake

Pinecrest Lake is located between Whistler and Squamish

Mounties deployed to help B.C. communities affected by wildfires

RCMP officers heading to places particularly within central, northern and southern B.C.

Quebec sets aside $900 million for companies hurt by U.S. tariffs

Premier Philippe Couillard says his government will make $863 million available over five years

B.C. company patents Sasquatch, the country’s first homegrown hops plant

Created by Hops Connect, Sasquatch hops are being grown commercially for the first time in B.C.

Farmers ponder impact of alternatives to pesticides being banned

The nicotine-based pesticides scientists have linked to a rising number of honey bee deaths will be phased out of use in Canada over a three year period starting in 2021.

Most Read