Courtenay mayor the only one on council who ‘gets it’

Dear editor,

I have been intrigued with the reaction by the Courtenay councillors to a suggestion of a citizens' finance committee.

Dear editor,

I have been intrigued with the reaction by the Courtenay councillors to Mayor Jangula’s suggestion that a citizens’ finance committee be created.

I am proud to live in a democratic society where our government is, “of the people, by the people and for the people.” Our country has fought hard to create and maintain this principal.

I am becoming a little disenchanted with our elected officials who carry on as though they know better than the people who put them where they are. By that I include many of our federal, provincial and local elected representatives.

These “representatives” are elected for varying periods. When we elect them we do not do so with any predetermined information on how they will act in relation to any specific budget, project, issue or proposal in mind.

Nor do we know what challenges may arise during their tenure.Typically we elect these people to represent us given each of their expression of attitude towards representing those in the electoral area.

When a budget, project, issue or proposal comes along we get a little better insight as to just how the people we elected will effect the budget, project, issue or proposal. Some decisions may be in keeping with our personal thinking while others may not.

In a democracy (at least this is my understanding of how it works) those who place people in these positions to make decisions concerning a multitude of things in their area of responsibility, it is not only my right as a citizen but my responsibility to provide feedback to the elected representatives, as to what I think of their decisions.

It seems, given the reported response to Mayor Jangula’s proposal  that Mayor Jangula is the only Courtenay City councillor who “gets it.”

Financing of our municipal responsibilities hits all of us and it seems reasonable that the collection of thoughts from throughout our electoral area by concerned and interested citizens would not only be responsible but informative and helpful.

Alternatively, our only ability to respond to decisions made by our elected officials is by way of letters to the editor — it is like trying to close the barn door after the cow gets out.

I would respectfully like to encourage our Courtenay City councillors to invite Mayor Jangula to reintroduce his suggestion for a citizen finance committee.

It may not end up being just as the mayor has introduced but something that at minimum collects a representative voice of the people who put them where they are — not to replace the councillors’ decision-making rather to enhance those decisions.

Larry Wenezenki,

Courtenay

 

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