Cycling parents, teach your children to do it right — and do it right yourself

Dear editor,

How did cyclists in the Comox Valley come to believe they can ride their bikes anywhere and any way they like?

Dear editor,

How did cyclists in the Comox Valley come to believe they can ride their bikes anywhere and any way they like?

I am seeing more and more cyclists without helmets or lights or reflectors riding on the sidewalk. Who said you could ride your bike on the sidewalk?

Many riders do not seem to know that when you are riding your bike and you have wheels under you, you are a vehicle and not a pedestrian.

You cannot ride your bike on the sidewalk and you must know the rules of the road (you know, things like stopping at stop signs, signalling your turns, taking your turn at four way stops, etc.).

I watched two young cyclists plaster an elderly couple walking down Fifth Street up against a wall. They were surprised and startled as the youth rode by side by side, taking up the entire sidewalk!

I have seen whole families riding together on the sidewalk. This is not the way to teach your children how to ride in town properly.

Teach them they are a vehicle when on their bikes. Teach them the rules of the road. Help them install lights and reflectors and make sure they wear helmets.

Remember, if you are on wheels you are not a pedestrian and you are not welcome on pedestrian infrastructure like sidewalks and pedestrian crosswalks.

You cannot be a vehicle one second and suddenly turn into a pedestrian the next without getting off your bike!

I find it hard to believe grown up people would ride after dark without lights or even a reflector. I absolutely hate driving down the road after dark and suddenly there, right beside me, is a cyclist that I simply could not see until I was on top of them.

Scary for me; dangerous for you.

Anyone who owns and rides a bike should have lights and reflectors on. Good riders have appropriate and reflective clothing, lights, reflectors and flashing lights fore and aft. Parents, how can you let your kids ride into dusk and even into the dark without lights?

How can you let your kids ride without a helmet?

Anyone who rides without a helmet is just plain dumb!

Many people (up to 80 per cent in some jurisdictions) ignore mandatory helmet laws because they are uncomfortable, don’t look good and the stupidest of all reasons — “I’ll show the government to tell me to wear a helmet!?”

I could take you to two locations in the Comox Valley that still bear the bloodstains left by cyclists from fatal head injury altercations with automobiles.

It seems it is up to you, though. Even though it is the law to wear a helmet, even though you are required to be a vehicle and follow the rules of the road.

Who is paying attention? Who would bust you?

Who gets to clean up the mess when your head looks more like a dropped watermelon?

If you read the signs as to how to cross the Fifth Street Bridge (the sign says ride across the bridge in traffic or dismount and use the sidewalk) this rule goes for everywhere! Ride with traffic or dismount and become a pedestrian.

Know the rules of the road. Just stop into the BC Access Centre at Cliffe and 26th and get yourself a driving guide.

For you younger folks this will make getting that precious driver’s licence way easier because you will know the rules way before your friends who do not cycle but, if you develop bad habits and do not study the rules and try to pass your driving exam, it will take longer. Learn the rules of the road now and ride your bike safely with traffic.

For you older folks, be a good example.

Lights, helmet, learn the rules of the road and remember when you are on wheels you are a vehicle not a pedestrian! As soon as you dismount and are on your feet then and only then are you welcome on pedestrian infrastructure (sidewalks and crosswalks).

Parents, teach your kids the rules of the road, and make sure they have a helmet and lights.

Jack Minard,

Courtenay

 

Just Posted

A young bear found deceased at the side of the road in the Comox Valley has conservation officers looking for answers around its death. Black Press file photo
Conservation seeking information for deceased Comox Valley bear

A young bear was found deceased at the side of the road near Kitty Coleman Park

Tools of the trade at the 2019 Vancouver Island MusicFest. Photo by Terry Farrell
Vancouver Island MusicFest goes virtual for 2021

Black Press to stream 25 hours of programming July 9-11

A look at the first stage of the treatment process - where binding of solids and particles in the raw water happens before the water moves to filtration. Photo, CVRD
Water to flow soon from new Comox Valley treatment plant

“We are at our last major hurdle before achieving this critical goal.”

Comox town hall. Black Press file photo
Comox looking at the future of transportation in the town

Council adopted the 2020 Transportation Master Plan Update

On Monday, June 14, 40 Knots Winery presented the We Can Shelter Project with a cheque for $5,000. Pictured, from left - We Can Shelter Society secretary Sue Finneron, We Can Shelter treasurer Ann Scott, 40 Knots Winery co-owner Brenda Hetman-Craig, and Charlene Davis, president of the We Can Shelter Society. Photo supplied
Comox Valley Winery makes major contribution to housing initiative

40 Knots Winery commits to purchasing a unit for We Can Shelter Society

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

The Calgary skyline is seen on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
2 deaths from COVID-19 Delta variant in Alberta, 1 patient was fully immunized

Kerry Williamson with Alberta Health Services says the patients likely acquired the virus in the hospital

B.C. Public Safety Minister Mike Farnworth and Attorney General David Eby attend opening of the first government-run B.C. Cannabis Store, Kamloops, Oct. 19, 2018. (B.C. government)
B.C. government to allow home cannabis delivery starting July 15

Added convenience expected to persuade buyers to ‘go legal’

The first suspension bridge is the tallest in Canada, with a second suspension bridge just below it. The two are connected by a trail that’s just over 1 km. (Claire Palmer photo)
PHOTOS: The highest suspension bridges in Canada just opened in B.C.

The Skybridge in Golden allows visitors to take in views standing at 130 and 80 metres

BC Green Party leader and Cowichan Valley MLA Sonia Furstenau introduced a petition to the provincial legislature on Thursday calling for the end of old-growth logging in the province. (File photo)
BC Green leader Furstenau introduces old-growth logging petition

Party calls for the end of old-growth logging as protests in Fairy Creek continue

B.C. Premier John Horgan leaves his office for a news conference in the legislature rose garden, June 3, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. premier roasted for office budget, taxing COVID-19 benefits

Youth addiction law that triggered election hasn’t appeared

Most Read